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类型【址:a g 9 559⒐ v i p】1:陈秀娟 大小:O5KwSKsF15366KB 下载:V3uKiLgM81368次
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日期:2020-08-09 16:39:33
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1.【址:a g 9 559⒐ v i p】1  Ulysses went back to his own place, and Eumaeus strewed some greenbrushwood on the floor and threw a sheepskin on top of it forTelemachus to sit upon. Then the swineherd brought them platters ofcold meat, the remains from what they had eaten the day before, and hefilled the bread baskets with bread as fast as he could. He mixed winealso in bowls of ivy-wood, and took his seat facing Ulysses. Then theylaid their hands on the good things that were before them, and as soonas they had had enough to eat and drink Telemachus said to Eumaeus,"Old friend, where does this stranger come from? How did his crewbring him to Ithaca, and who were they?-for assuredly he did notcome here by land"'
2.  Here he ended, and the guests sat all of them enthralled andspeechless throughout the covered cloister. Then Arete said to them:
3.  "And now, tell me and tell me true. Where have you been wandering,and in what countries have you travelled? Tell us of the peoplesthemselves, and of their cities- who were hostile, savage anduncivilized, and who, on the other hand, hospitable and humane. Tellus also why you are made unhappy on hearing about the return of theArgive Danaans from Troy. The gods arranged all this, and sent themtheir misfortunes in order that future generations might havesomething to sing about. Did you lose some brave kinsman of yourwife's when you were before Troy? a son-in-law or father-in-law- whichare the nearest relations a man has outside his own flesh and blood?or was it some brave and kindly-natured comrade- for a good friendis as dear to a man as his own brother?"
4.  "After him I saw huge Orion in a meadow full of asphodel driving theghosts of the wild beasts that he had killed upon the mountains, andhe had a great bronze club in his hand, unbreakable for ever and ever.
5.  "These men hatched a plot against me that would have reduced me tothe very extreme of misery, for when the ship had got some way outfrom land they resolved on selling me as a slave. They stripped meof the shirt and cloak that I was wearing, and gave me instead thetattered old clouts in which you now see me; then, towardsnightfall, they reached the tilled lands of Ithaca, and there theybound me with a strong rope fast in the ship, while they went on shoreto get supper by the sea side. But the gods soon undid my bonds forme, and having drawn my rags over my head I slid down the rudderinto the sea, where I struck out and swam till I was well clear ofthem, and came ashore near a thick wood in which I lay concealed. Theywere very angry at my having escaped and went searching about forme, till at last they thought it was no further use and went back totheir ship. The gods, having hidden me thus easily, then took me toa good man's door- for it seems that I am not to die yet awhile."
6.  "[The gale from the West had now spent its force, and the wind gotinto the South again, which frightened me lest I should be takenback to the terrible whirlpool of Charybdis. This indeed was whatactually happened, for I was borne along by the waves all night, andby sunrise had reacfied the rock of Scylla, and the whirlpool. She wasthen sucking down the salt sea water, but I was carried aloft towardthe fig tree, which I caught hold of and clung on to like a bat. Icould not plant my feet anywhere so as to stand securely, for theroots were a long way off and the boughs that overshadowed the wholepool were too high, too vast, and too far apart for me to reachthem; so I hung patiently on, waiting till the pool should dischargemy mast and raft again- and a very long while it seemed. A jurymanis not more glad to get home to supper, after having been longdetained in court by troublesome cases, than I was to see my raftbeginning to work its way out of the whirlpool again. At last I let gowith my hands and feet, and fell heavily into the sea, bard by my rafton to which I then got, and began to row with my hands. As for Scylla,the father of gods and men would not let her get further sight ofme- otherwise I should have certainly been lost.]

计划指导

1.  As he thus prayed, Minerva came close up to him in the likenessand with the voice of Mentor. "Telemachus," said she, "if you are madeof the same stuff as your father you will be neither fool nor cowardhenceforward, for Ulysses never broke his word nor left his workhalf done. If, then, you take after him, your voyage will not befruitless, but unless you have the blood of Ulysses and of Penelope inyour veins I see no likelihood of your succeeding. Sons are seldomas good men as their fathers; they are generally worse, not better;still, as you are not going to be either fool or cowardhenceforward, and are not entirely without some share of your father'swise discernment, I look with hope upon your undertaking. But mind younever make common cause with any of those foolish suitors, for theyhave neither sense nor virtue, and give no thought to death and to thedoom that will shortly fall on one and all of them, so that they shallperish on the same day. As for your voyage, it shall not be longdelayed; your father was such an old friend of mine that I will findyou a ship, and will come with you myself. Now, however, returnhome, and go about among the suitors; begin getting provisions readyfor your voyage; see everything well stowed, the wine in jars, and thebarley meal, which is the staff of life, in leathern bags, while Igo round the town and beat up volunteers at once. There are many shipsin Ithaca both old and new; I will run my eye over them for you andwill choose the best; we will get her ready and will put out to seawithout delay."
2.  "They all swore as she told them, and when they had completedtheir oath the woman said, 'Hush; and if any of your men meets me inthe street or at the well, do not let him speak to me, for fear someone should go and tell my master, in which case he would suspectsomething. He would put me in prison, and would have all of youmurdered; keep your own counsel therefore; buy your merchandise asfast as you can, and send me word when you have done loading. I willbring as much gold as I can lay my hands on, and there is somethingelse also that I can do towards paying my fare. I am nurse to theson of the good man of the house, a funny little fellow just able torun about. I will carry him off in your ship, and you will get a greatdeal of money for him if you take him and sell him in foreign parts.'
3.  "They all swore as she told them, and when they had completedtheir oath the woman said, 'Hush; and if any of your men meets me inthe street or at the well, do not let him speak to me, for fear someone should go and tell my master, in which case he would suspectsomething. He would put me in prison, and would have all of youmurdered; keep your own counsel therefore; buy your merchandise asfast as you can, and send me word when you have done loading. I willbring as much gold as I can lay my hands on, and there is somethingelse also that I can do towards paying my fare. I am nurse to theson of the good man of the house, a funny little fellow just able torun about. I will carry him off in your ship, and you will get a greatdeal of money for him if you take him and sell him in foreign parts.'
4.  As he spoke he kissed his son, and a tear fell from his cheek onto the ground, for he had restrained all tears till now. butTelemachus could not yet believe that it was his father, and said:
5.  Then turning to Antinous he said, "Antinous, you take as much careof my interests as though I were your son. Why should you want tosee this stranger turned out of the house? Heaven forbid; take'something and give it him yourself; I do not grudge it; I bid you takeit. Never mind my mother, nor any of the other servants in thehouse; but I know you will not do what I say, for you are more fond ofeating things yourself than of giving them to other people."
6.  "Meanwhile Circe had been seeing that the men who had been leftbehind were washed and anointed with olive oil; she had also giventhem woollen cloaks and shirts, and when we came we found them allcomfortably at dinner in her house. As soon as the men saw eachother face to face and knew one another, they wept for joy and criedaloud till the whole palace rang again. Thereon Circe came up to meand said, 'Ulysses, noble son of Laertes, tell your men to leave offcrying; I know how much you have all of you suffered at sea, and howill you have fared among cruel savages on the mainland, but that isover now, so stay here, and eat and drink till you are once more asstrong and hearty as you were when you left Ithaca; for at present youare weakened both in body and mind; you keep all the time thinkingof the hardships- you have suffered during your travels, so that youhave no more cheerfulness left in you.'

推荐功能

1.  Then Melanthius the goatherd answered, "You ill-conditioned cur,what are you talking about? Some day or other I will put you onboard ship and take you to a foreign country, where I can sell you andpocket the money you will fetch. I wish I were as sure that Apollowould strike Telemachus dead this very day, or that the suitorswould kill him, as I am that Ulysses will never come home again."
2.  As he spoke he handed her the cup. Minerva thought it very right andproper of him to have given it to herself first; she accordingly beganpraying heartily to Neptune. "O thou," she cried, "that encirclest theearth, vouchsafe to grant the prayers of thy servants that call uponthee. More especially we pray thee send down thy grace on Nestor andon his sons; thereafter also make the rest of the Pylian people somehandsome return for the goodly hecatomb they are offering you. Lastly,grant Telemachus and myself a happy issue, in respect of the matterthat has brought us in our to Pylos."
3.  Then nurse Euryclea said, "My child, what are you talking about? butyou were all hard of belief and have made up your mind that yourhusband is never coming, although he is in the house and by his ownfire side at this very moment. Besides I can give you another proof;when I was washing him I perceived the scar which the wild boar gavehim, and I wanted to tell you about it, but in his wisdom he would notlet me, and clapped his hands over my mouth; so come with me and Iwill make this bargain with you- if I am deceiving you, you may haveme killed by the most cruel death you can think of."
4.  "Father Jove," answered the stockman, "would indeed that you mightso ordain it. If some god were but to bring Ulysses back, you shouldsee with what might and main I would fight for him."
5.   "After him I saw huge Orion in a meadow full of asphodel driving theghosts of the wild beasts that he had killed upon the mountains, andhe had a great bronze club in his hand, unbreakable for ever and ever.
6.  To this Penelope replied, "Eurymachus, heaven robbed me of all mybeauty whether of face or figure when the Argives set sail for Troyand my dear husband with them. If he were to return and look aftermy affairs, I should both be more respected and show a better presenceto the world. As it is, I am oppressed with care, and with theafflictions which heaven has seen fit to heap upon me. My husbandforesaw it all, and when he was leaving home he took my right wrist inhis hand- 'Wife, 'he said, 'we shall not all of us come safe homefrom Troy, for the Trojans fight well both with bow and spear. Theyare excellent also at fighting from chariots, and nothing decidesthe issue of a fight sooner than this. I know not, therefore,whether heaven will send me back to you, or whether I may not fallover there at Troy. In the meantime do you look after things here.Take care of my father and mother as at present, and even more soduring my absence, but when you see our son growing a beard, thenmarry whom you will, and leave this your present home. This is what hesaid and now it is all coming true. A night will come when I shallhave to yield myself to a marriage which I detest, for Jove hastaken from me all hope of happiness. This further grief, moreover,cuts me to the very heart. You suitors are not wooing me after thecustom of my country. When men are courting a woman who they thinkwill be a good wife to them and who is of noble birth, and when theyare each trying to win her for himself, they usually bring oxen andsheep to feast the friends of the lady, and they make hermagnificent presents, instead of eating up other people's propertywithout paying for it."

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1.  Thus did they converse, and meanwhile the ship which had broughtTelemachus and his crew from Pylos had reached the town of Ithaca.When they had come inside the harbour they drew the ship on to theland; their servants came and took their armour from them, and theyleft all the presents at the house of Clytius. Then they sent aservant to tell Penelope that Telemachus had gone into the country,but had sent the ship to the town to prevent her from being alarmedand made unhappy. This servant and Eumaeus happened to meet whenthey were both on the same errand of going to tell Penelope. When theyreached the House, the servant stood up and said to the queen in thepresence of the waiting women, "Your son, Madam, is now returnedfrom Pylos"; but Eumaeus went close up to Penelope, and said privatelythat her son had given bidden him tell her. When he had given hismessage he left the house with its outbuildings and went back to hispigs again.
2.  "My good friend," answered Jove, "I should recommend you at the verymoment when the people from the city are watching the ship on her way,to turn it into a rock near the land and looking like a ship. Thiswill astonish everybody, and you can then bury their city under themountain."
3.  Then Ulysses in his turn melted, and wept as he clasped his dear andfaithful wife to his bosom. As the sight of land is welcome to men whoare swimming towards the shore, when Neptune has wrecked their shipwith the fury of his winds and waves- a few alone reach the land,and these, covered with brine, are thankful when they findthemselves on firm ground and out of danger- even so was her husbandwelcome to her as she looked upon him, and she could not tear hertwo fair arms from about his neck. Indeed they would have gone onindulging their sorrow till rosy-fingered morn appeared, had notMinerva determined otherwise, and held night back in the far west,while she would not suffer Dawn to leave Oceanus, nor to yoke thetwo steeds Lampus and Phaethon that bear her onward to break the dayupon mankind.
4、  On this she led the way, and Ulysses followed in her steps; butnot one of the Phaecians could see him as he passed through the cityin the midst of them; for the great goddess Minerva in her good willtowards him had hidden him in a thick cloud of darkness. He admiredtheir harbours, ships, places of assembly, and the lofty walls ofthe city, which, with the palisade on top of them, were very striking,and when they reached the king's house Minerva said:
5、  Eurymachus son of Polybus then said, "Go home, old man, and prophesyto your own children, or it may be worse for them. I can read theseomens myself much better than you can; birds are always flying aboutin the sunshine somewhere or other, but they seldom mean anything.Ulysses has died in a far country, and it is a pity you are not deadalong with him, instead of prating here about omens and adding fuel tothe anger of Telemachus which is fierce enough as it is. I suppose youthink he will give you something for your family, but I tell you-and it shall surely be- when an old man like you, who should knowbetter, talks a young one over till he becomes troublesome, in thefirst place his young friend will only fare so much the worse- he willtake nothing by it, for the suitors will prevent this- and in thenext, we will lay a heavier fine, sir, upon yourself than you willat all like paying, for it will bear hardly upon you. As forTelemachus, I warn him in the presence of you all to send his motherback to her father, who will find her a husband and provide her withall the marriage gifts so dear a daughter may expect. Till we shall goon harassing him with our suit; for we fear no man, and care neitherfor him, with all his fine speeches, nor for any fortune-telling ofyours. You may preach as much as you please, but we shall only hateyou the more. We shall go back and continue to eat up Telemachus'sestate without paying him, till such time as his mother leaves offtormenting us by keeping us day after day on the tiptoe ofexpectation, each vying with the other in his suit for a prize of suchrare perfection. Besides we cannot go after the other women whom weshould marry in due course, but for the way in which she treats us."

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  • 邓萍 08-08

      When it was time for them to start home, and they were folding theclothes and putting them into the waggon, Minerva began to considerhow Ulysses should wake up and see the handsome girl who was toconduct him to the city of the Phaeacians. The girl, therefore,threw a ball at one of the maids, which missed her and fell intodeep water. On this they all shouted, and the noise they made wokeUlysses, who sat up in his bed of leaves and began to wonder what itmight all be.

  • 亚瑟·莱缪尔 08-08

      She then went quickly on, and Telemachus followed in her stepstill they reached the place where the guilds of the Pylian people wereassembled. There they found Nestor sitting with his sons, while hiscompany round him were busy getting dinner ready, and putting piecesof meat on to the spits while other pieces were cooking. When they sawthe strangers they crowded round them, took them by the hand andbade them take their places. Nestor's son Pisistratus at onceoffered his hand to each of them, and seated them on some softsheepskins that were lying on the sands near his father and hisbrother Thrasymedes. Then he gave them their portions of the inwardmeats and poured wine for them into a golden cup, handing it toMinerva first, and saluting her at the same time.

  • 高继祥 08-08

       And Ulysses answered, "I will tell you all about it. If there weremeat and wine enough, and we could stay here in the hut with nothingto do but to eat and drink while the others go to their work, Icould easily talk on for a whole twelve months without everfinishing the story of the sorrows with which it has pleased heaven tovisit me.

  • 沙希 08-08

      "Eumaeus, what a noble hound that is over yonder on the manure heap:his build is splendid; is he as fine a fellow as he looks, or is heonly one of those dogs that come begging about a table, and are keptmerely for show?"

  • 谭俊华 08-07

    {  And Ulysses said, "Nausicaa, daughter of great Alcinous, may Jovethe mighty husband of Juno, grant that I may reach my home; so shall Ibless you as my guardian angel all my days, for it was you who savedme."

  • 蒋建明 08-06

      As he spoke he went on board, and bade the others do so also andloose the hawsers, so they took their places in the ship. ButTelemachus bound on his sandals, and took a long and doughty spearwith a head of sharpened bronze from the deck of the ship. Then theyloosed the hawsers, thrust the ship off from land, and made on towardsthe city as they had been told to do, while Telemachus strode on asfast as he could, till he reached the homestead where his countlessherds of swine were feeding, and where dwelt the excellentswineherd, who was so devoted a servant to his master.}

  • 乐卫星 08-06

      And Telemachus answered, "I will tell you truly everything. There isno emnity between me and my people, nor can I complain of brothers, towhom a man may look for support however great his quarrel may be. Jovehas made us a race of only sons. Laertes was the only son ofArceisius, and Ulysses only son of Laertes. I am myself the only sonof Ulysses who left me behind him when he went away, so that I havenever been of any use to him. Hence it comes that my house is in thehands of numberless marauders; for the chiefs from all theneighbouring islands, Dulichium, Same, Zacynthus, as also all theprincipal men of Ithaca itself, are eating up my house under thepretext of paying court to my mother, who will neither say point blankthat she will not marry, nor yet bring matters to an end, so theyare making havoc of my estate, and before long will do so withmyself into the bargain. The issue, however, rests with heaven. But doyou, old friend Eumaeus, go at once and tell Penelope that I am safeand have returned from Pylos. Tell it to herself alone, and thencome back here without letting any one else know, for there are manywho are plotting mischief against me."

  • 惠凤鸣 08-06

      With these words he sat down, and Mentor who had been a friend ofUlysses, and had been left in charge of everything with full authorityover the servants, rose to speak. He, then, plainly and in all honestyaddressed them thus:

  • 周玉婷 08-05

       But King Neptune, who was returning from the Ethiopians, caughtsight of Ulysses a long way off, from the mountains of the Solymi.He could see him sailing upon the sea, and it made him very angry,so he wagged his head and muttered to himself, saying, heavens, so thegods have been changing their minds about Ulysses while I was awayin Ethiopia, and now he is close to the land of the Phaeacians,where it is decreed that he shall escape from the calamities that havebefallen him. Still, he shall have plenty of hardship yet before hehas done with it."

  • 王安春 08-03

    {  "I am by birth a Cretan; my father was a well-to-do man, who hadmany sons born in marriage, whereas I was the son of a slave whom hehad purchased for a concubine; nevertheless, my father Castor son ofHylax (whose lineage I claim, and who was held in the highest honouramong the Cretans for his wealth, prosperity, and the valour of hissons) put me on the same level with my brothers who had been born inwedlock. When, however, death took him to the house of Hades, his sonsdivided his estate and cast lots for their shares, but to me they gavea holding and little else; nevertheless, my valour enabled me to marryinto a rich family, for I was not given to bragging, or shirking onthe field of battle. It is all over now; still, if you look at thestraw you can see what the ear was, for I have had trouble enoughand to spare. Mars and Minerva made me doughty in war; when I hadpicked my men to surprise the enemy with an ambuscade I never gavedeath so much as a thought, but was the first to leap forward andspear all whom I could overtake. Such was I in battle, but I did notcare about farm work, nor the frugal home life of those who wouldbring up children. My delight was in ships, fighting, javelins, andarrows- things that most men shudder to think of; but one man likesone thing and another another, and this was what I was mostnaturally inclined to. Before the Achaeans went to Troy, nine timeswas I in command of men and ships on foreign service, and I amassedmuch wealth. I had my pick of the spoil in the first instance, andmuch more was allotted to me later on.

  • 闵小权 08-03

      The immortal gods burst out laughing as they heard him, butNeptune took it all seriously, and kept on imploring Vulcan to setMars free again. "Let him go," he cried, "and I will undertake, as yourequire, that he shall pay you all the damages that are heldreasonable among the immortal gods."

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