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类型【址:a g 9 559⒐ v i p】1:李学林 大小:AW0x8ZRB99090KB 下载:LFzvrgnl62158次
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日期:2020-08-07 16:12:17
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1.【址:a g 9 559⒐ v i p】1  Matters proceeding on in this manner, and continuing longer thentheir love-sick passions easily could permit, yet neither being ableto finde out any other meanes of helpe; it fortuned that the King ofThunis promised his daughter in marriage to the King of Granada,whereat she grew exceedingly sorrowfull, perceiving, that not onelyshe should be sent further off, by a large distance of way from herfriend, but also be deprived utterly, of all hope ever to enjoy him.And if she could have devised any meanes, either by secret flight fromher Father, or any way else to further her intention, she would haveadventured it for the Princes sake. Gerbino in like maner bearing ofthis purposed marriage, lived in a hell of torments, consultingoftentimes with his soule, how he might be possessed of her bypower, when she should be sent by Sea to her husband, or privatestealing her away from her Fathers Court before: with these andinfinite other thoughts, was he incessantly afflicted, both day andnight.
2.  Then the Children began to cry, saying; that they would tarriestil by the good olde man, because he loved them better then theirMaster did; whereat both the Lady and the Count began to smile. TheCount, a poore Begger, and not as Father to so great a Lady, arose,and did her humble reverence, because she was now a Noble Woman,conceyving wonderfull joy in his soule, to see her so faire and goodlya creature: yet could she take no knowledge of him, Age, want, andmisery had so mightily altered him; his head all white, his beardwithout any comly forme, his Garments so poore, and his face sowrinkled, leane and meager, that he seemed rather some Carter, thena Count. And Gianetta perceiving that when her Children were fetchtaway, they returned againe to the olde man, and would not leave him,she desired their Maister to let them alone.While thus the Children continued making much of the good olde man,Lord Andrew Mandevile, Father to Sir Roger, came into the Hall, asbeing so willed to doe by the Childrens Schoolemaster. He being ahastie-minded man, and one that ever-despised Gianetta before, butmuch more since her marriage to his sonne, angerly said; Let themalone with a mischeefe, and so befall them, their best company oughtto bee with beggers, for so they are bred and borne by the Mothersside: and therefore it is no mervaile, if like will to like, a beggersbrats to keepe company with beggers. The Count hearing thesecontemptible wordes, was not a little greeved thereat; and althoughhis courage was greater then his poore condition would permit him toexpresse; yet, clouding all injuries with noble patience, hangingdowne his head, and shedding many a salt teare, endured this reproach,as hee had done many, both before and after.
3.  When he heard himselfe so severely conjured, by the love he bareto her, and loved none else in the world beside: he gave a farremore hart-sicke sigh, then before. Then his Lady and Mistresseentreated him seriously, to let her know the cause of those twodeepe sighes: whereto Anichino thus replyed. Madam, if I should tellyou, I stand greatly in feare of offending you: and when I have toldyou, I doubt your discovery thereof to some other. Beleeve me Anichino(quoth she) therein thou neither canst, or shalt offend me.Moreover, assure thy selfe, that I will never disclose it to anyother, except I may do it with thy consent. Madame (saide hee)seeing you have protested such a solemne promise to mee, I willreveale no meane secret unto you.
4.  In good sadnesse Sir (quoth the Host) you see that my house isfull of Guests, so that I and my people, must gladly sleepe on thetables and benches: Neverthelesse, next adjoyning to my Lord AbbotsChamber, there are certaine Corn-lofts, whether I can closely bringyou, and making shift there with a slender Pallet-bed, it may servefor one night, insted of a better. But mine Host (quoth Alessandro)how can I passe thorow my Lords Chamber, which is so little, as itwould not allow Lodging for any of his Monkes? If I had remembred somuch (said the Host) before the Curtaines were drawne, I could havelodged his Monkes in the Corne-lofts, and then both you and I mighthave slept where now they doe. But feare you not, my Lords Curtainesare close drawne, hee sleepeth (no doubt) soundly, and I canconveigh you thither quietly enough, without the least disturbanceto him, and a Pallet-bed shall be fitted there for you. Alessandroperceiving that all this might be easily done, and no diseaseoffered to the Abbot, accepted it willingly, and went thitherwithout any noyse at all.
5.  To her my bondage is free liberty,
6.  My Lord, when Ghinotto was yonger then now he is, he studyedPhysicke, and he commanded me to tell you, that the very bestmedicine, he could ever learne, against any disease in the stomacke,was this which he had provided for your Lordship, as an especialpreparative, and which he should finde to be very comfortable. TheAbbot, who had a better stomacke to eate, then any will or desire totalke: although hee did it somewhat disdainfully, yet hee eate up boththe toastes, and roundly dranke the Glasse of Bastard. Afterward,divers other speeches passed betweene them, the one still advisingin Phisicall manner, and the other seeming to care little for it:but moved many questions concerning Ghinotto, and earnestly requestingto see him. Such speeches as savoured of the Abbots discontentment,and came from him in passion; were clouded with courteousacceptance, and not the least signe of any mislike: but assuring hisLordship, that Ghinotto intended very shortly to see him, and sothey parted for that time.Nor returned he any more, till the next morning with the like twotoastes of bread, and such another Glasse of white Bastard, as hehad brought him at the first, continuing the same course for diversdayes after: till the Abbot had eaten (and very hungerly too) a prettystore of dryed Beanes, which Ghinotto purposely, (yet secretly) hadhidden in the Chamber. Whereupon he demaunded of him (as seeming to beso enjoyned by his pretended master) in what temper he found hisstomacke now? I should finde my stomacke well enough (answered theLord Abbot) if I could get forth of thy masters fingers, and then havesome good food to feed on: for his medicines have made me so soundlystomackt, that I am ready to starve with hunger.

计划指导

1.  While Thorello remayned in this his Faulconers condition, itfortuned uppon a day, that Saladine, conversing with him about hisHawkes: Thorello chanced to smile, and used such a kinde of gesture ormotion with his Lippes, which Saladine (when he was in his house atPavia) had heedfully observed, and by this note, instantly heremembred Signior Thorello, and began to eye him very respectively,perswading himselfe that he was the same man. And therefore fallingfrom their former kinde of discoursing: Tell me: Christian (quothSaladine) what Country-man art thou of the West? Sir, answeredSigniour Thorello, I am by Country a Lombard, borne in a Cittycalled Pavia, a poore man, and of as poore condition.
2.  Being come to Florence, he went to an Inne kept by two brethren,neere neighbours to the dwelling of his Mistresse, and the first thinghe did, was passing by her doore, to get a sight of her if he wereso happie. But he found the windowes, doores, and all parts of thehouse fast shut up, whereby he suspected her to be dead, or else to bechanged from her dwelling: wherefore (much perplexed in minde) he wenton to the two brothers Inne, finding foure persons standing at thegate, attired in mourning, whereat he marvelled not a little;knowing himselfe to be so transfigured, both in body and babite, farrefrom the manner of common use at his parting thence, as it was adifficult matter to know him: he stept boldly to a Shooe-makers shopneere adjoyning, and demanded the reason of their wearing mourning.The Shooe-maker made answer thus; Sir, those men are clad in mourning,because a brother of theirs, being named Theobaldo (who hath beeneabsent hence a long while) about some fifteene dayes since was slaine.And they having heard, by proofe made in the Court of justice, thatone Aldobrandino Palermini (who is kept close prisoner) was themurtherer of him, as he came in a disguised habite to his daughter, ofwhom he was most affectionately enamoured; cannot chuse, but let theWorld know by their outward habits, the inward affliction of theirhearts, for a deede so dishonourably committed. Theobaldo wonderedgreatly hereat, imagining, that some man belike resembling him inshape, might be slaine in this manner, and by Aldobrandino, forwhose misfortune he grieved marvellously. As concerning his Mistresse,he understood that shee was living, and in good health; and nightdrawing on apace, he went to his lodging, with infinite molestationsin his minde, where after supper, he was lodged in a Corne-loft withhis man. Now by reason of many disturbing imaginations, whichincessantly wheeled about his braine, his bed also being none of thebest, and his supper (perhaps) somewhat of the coursest; a greatpart of the night was spent, yet could he not close his eyes together.But lying still broade awake, about the dead time of night, he heardthe treading of divers persons over his head, who discended downe apaire of stayres by his Chamber, into the lower parts of the house,carrying a light with them, which he discerned by the chinkes andcrannies in the wall. Stepping softly out of his bed, to see whatthe meaning hereof might be, he espied a faire young woman, whocarried a light in her hand, and three men in her company,descending downe the stayres together, one of them speaking thus tothe young woman. Now we may boldly warrant our saftey, because we haveheard it assuredly, that the death of Theobaldo Elisei, hath beenesufficiently approved by the Brethren, against Aldobrandino Palermini,and he hath confessed the fact; whereupon the sentence is alreadyset downe in writing. But yet it behooveth us notwithstanding, toconceale it very secretly, because if ever hereafter it should beknowne, that we are they who murthered him, we shall be in the samedanger, as now Aldobrandino is.
3.  But, as we see it oftentimes come to passe, that by how much thelower hope declineth, so much the higher love ascendeth; even sofell it out with this poore Querry; for, most irkesome was it tohim, to endure the heavy waight of his continuall oppressions, nothaving any hope at all of the very least mitigation. And being utterlyunable to relinquish his love divers times he resolved on somedesperate conclusion, which might yet give the world an evidenttestimony, that he dyed for the love he bare to the Queene. And uponthis determination, hee grounded the successe of his future fortune,to dye in compassing some part of his desire, without eitherspeaking to the Queene, or sending any missive of his love; for tospeake or write, were meerely in vaine, and drew on a worserconsequence then death, which he could bestow on himselfe more easily,and when he listed.
4.  According as she was instructed by her Mistresse, she fell at thefeete of Master Doctor, desiring him to pardon a great error,whereby she had over-much offended him. As how? said Master Doctor. Inthis manner (quoth the Maide) and thus proceeded. You are not ignorantSir, what a lewde liver Ruggiero de Jeroly is, and notwithstanding allhis imperfections, how deerely I love him, as he protesteth the liketo me, and thus hath our love continued a yeere, and more. You beinggone to Malfy, and your absence granting me apt opportunity, forconference with so kinde a friend; I made the bolder, and gave himentrance into your house, yea even into mine owne Chamber, yet freefrom any abuse, neither did he (bad though he be) offer any. Thirstyhe was before his comming thither, either by salt meat, or distempereddiet, and I being unable to fetch him wine or water, by reason myMistresse sat in the Hall, seriously talking with her Sisters;remembred, that I saw a violl of Water standing in your ChamberWindow, which he drinking quite off, I set it empty in the placeagaine. I have heard your discontentment for the said Water, andconfesse my fault to you therein: but who liveth so justly, withoutoffending at one time or other? And I am heartily sory for mytransgression; yet not so much for the water, as the hard fortune thathath followed thereon; because thereby Ruggiero is in danger to losehis life, and all my hopes are utterly lost. Let me entreat youtherefore (gentle Master) first to pardon me, and then to grant mepermission, to succour my poore condemned friend, by all the bestmeanes I can devise.
5.  THE SEVENTH DAY, THE THIRD NOVELL
6.  In regard of which deniall, Messer Geri commaunded one of hisservants, to take a small Bottle, and request Cistio to fill it withhis good Wine; then afterward, to serve it in such sparing manner tothe Table, that each Gentleman might be allowed halfe a glasse-full attheir down-sitting. The Serving-man, who had heard great report of theWine, and was halfe offended because he could never taste thereof:tooke a great Flaggon Bottle, containing foure or five Gallons atthe least, and comming there-with unto Cistio, saide unto him. Cistio,because my Master cannot have your companie among his friends, heprayes you to fill this Bottle with your best Wine. Cistio lookinguppon the huge Flaggon, replyed thus. Honest Fellow, Messer Geri neversent thee with such a Message to me: which although the Serving-manvery stoutly maintained, yet getting no other answer, he returnedbacke therwith to his Master.

推荐功能

1.  Thorello (whom the Soldane called by no other name, then theChristian, neyther of them knowing the other) sadly now remembredhis departure from Pavia, devising and practising many times, how hemight escape thence, but could not compasse it by any possible meanes.Wherefore, certaine Ambassadours beeing sent by the Genewayes, toredeeme divers Cittizens of theirs, there detained as prisoners, andbeing ready to returne home againe: he purposed to write to hisWife, that he was living, and wold repaire to her so soone as hecould, desiring the still continued rememberance of her limitedtime. By close and cunning meanes hee wrote the Letter, earnestlyintreating one of the Ambassadors (who knew him perfectly, but made nooutward apparance thereof) to deale in such sort for him, that theLetter might be delivered to the handes of the Abbot Di San Pietroin Ciel d'Oro, who was (indeede) his Unckle.
2.  In the time of this plague and dreadful visitation, the LordPresident, his Lady, Sonnes, Daughters, Brothers, Nephewes, andKindred dyed, none remaining alive, but one onely Daughtermarriageable, a few of the houshold servants, beside Perotto, whom(after the sickenesse was more mildly asswaged) with counsell andconsent of the Countrey people, the young Lady accepted to be herhusband, because hee was a man so worthy and valiant; and of all theinheritance left by her deceased Father, she made him Lord, and solecommander. Within no long while after, the King of Englandunderstanding that his President of Wales was dead, and Fame liberallyrelating the vertues, valour, and good parts of Perotto the Piccard,hee created him President thereof, and to supply the place of hisdeceased Lord. These faire fortunes, within the compasse of so short atime, fell to the two innocent children of the Count D'Angiers afterthey were left by him as lost and forlorne.
3.  AND MEET TO SIT ON THE SEATE OF AUTHORITY
4.  When Egano heard these Words, sodainely hee started out of Bed,saying. Doe I foster such a Snake in mine owne bosome? GramercieWife for this politicke promise of thine, and beleeve mee, I meaneto follow it effectually. So, on he put his Ladies Night-gown, herformall head Attire and Chin-cloth, going presently downe into theGarden, to expect Anichinoes comming to the Pine-Tree. But beforethe matter grew to this issue, let me demand of you faire Ladies, inwhat a lamentable condition (as you may imagine) was poore Anichino;to bee so strongly detained by her, heare all his amorous suitediscovered, and likely to draw very heavy afflictions on him?Undoubtedly, he looked for immediate apprehension by Egano,imprisonment and publike punishment for his so malapert presumption:and had it proved so, she had much renowned her selfe, and dealtwith him but as he had justlie deserved.
5.   It is my part therefore, to entreat thee, to comfort her longlanguishing desires: but if thou persist in thy harsh opinion, instead of reputing thee a wise and fortunate yong man, I shall confessethee to bee an ignoraunt Asse. What a glorie is it to thee, to beaffected of so faire and worthy a Lady, beyond all men elsewhatsoever? Next to this, tell me, how highly maist thou confessethy self beholding to Fortune, if thou but duly consider, how sheehath elected thee as sole soveraigne of her hopes, which is a crowneof honour to thy youth and a sufficient refuge against all wants andnecessities? Where is any to thy knowledge like thy selfe, that canmake such advantage of his time, as thou maist do, if thou wertwise? Where canst thou find any one to go beyond thee in Armes,Horses, sumptuous garments, and Gold, as will be heaped on thee, ifLydia may be the Lady of thy love? Open then thine understanding to mywords, returne into thine owne souie, and bee wise for thy selfe.
6.  Two yong Gentlemen, the one named Melisso, borne in the City ofLaiazzo: and the other Giose of Antioche, travalled together untoSalomon, the famous King of Great Britaine. The one desiring to learnewhat he should do, whereby to compasse and winne the love of men.The other craved to be enstructed by what meanes hee might reclaime anheadstrong and unruly wife. And what answeres the wise King gaveunto them both, before they departed away from him.

应用

1.  DECLARING WHAT AN HONOURABLE VERTUE COURTESIE IS, IN THEM
2.  When the feasting was finished, he caused a Ship to be furnished forthem, graunting them license to depart from Geneway when they pleased;whither they returned most richly and joyfully, being welcomed homewith great honour, especially Madam Genevra, whom every one supposedto be dead; and alwayes after, so long as she lived, shee was mostfamous for her manifold vertues. But as for Ambroginolo, the veriesame day that hee was impaled on the stake, annointed with honey,and fixed in the place appointed, to his no meane torment: he notonely died, but likewise was devoured to the bare bones, by Flies,Waspes, and Hornets, whereof the Countrey notoriously aboundeth. Andhis bones, in full forme and fashion, remained strangely blacke fora long time after, knit together by the sinewes; as a witnesse to manythousands of people, which afterward beheld the Carkasse of hiswickednesse against so good and vertuous a Woman, that had not so muchas a thought of any evill towards him. And thus was the Proverbe trulyverified, that shame succeedeth after ugly sinne, and the deceiveris trampled and trod, by such as himselfe hath deceived.
3.  When in unkinde exchange;
4、  "Others also may say, that shee is married to him, to whom itbelonged not to marrie her. These complaints are foolish, andwomanish, proceeding from verie little, or no consideration at all. Inthese daies of ours, Fortune makes no use of novell or inconsideratemeanes, whereby to bring matters to their determined effect. Whyshould it offend me, if a Cobler, rather than a Scholler, hath ended abusinesse of mine, either in private or publique, if the end be wellmade? Well I may take order, if the Cobler bee indiscreet, that heemeddle no more with any matters of mine, yet I ought, in courtesie, tothanke him for that which hee did.
5、  SUBTILITY OF SOME RELIGIOUS CARNALL MINDED MEN, TO

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网友评论(Kph1WtF890858))

  • 陈先梅 08-06

      This Sonne of mine Jeronimo, being as yet but foureteene years ofage, is so deeply enamoured of a yong Girle, named Silvestra, daughterunto a poore Tailor, our neere dwelling neighbour: that if we do notsend him out of her company, one day (perhaps) he may make her hiswife, and yet without any knowledge of ours, which questionlesse wouldbe my death. Otherwise, he may pine and consume himselfe away, if hesee us procure her marriage to some other. Wherefore, hold it good,that to avoid so great an inconvenience, we should send Jeronimosome far distance hence, to remaine where some of our Factors areemployed: because, when he shall be out of her sight, and theiroften meetings utterly disappointed; his affection to her will thesooner cease, by frustrating his hope for ever enjoying her, and so weshall have the better meanes, to match him with one of greaterquality. The Tutors did like well of her advice, not doubting but itwould take answerable effect: and therefore, calling Jeronimo into aprivate Parlor, one of them began in this manner.

  • 白松 08-06

      Understand then, my most worthy Auditors, that there livedsometime in Millaine an Almaigne Soldiour, named Gulfardo, ofcommendable carriage in his person, and very faithfull to such as heserved, a matter not common among the Almaignes. And because he madejust repayment, to every one which lent him monies; he grew to suchespeciall credit, and was so familiar with the very best Marchants; as(manie times) he could not be so ready to borrow, as they were willingalwaies to lend him. He thus continuing in the Cittie of Millaine,fastened his affection on a verie beautifull Gentlewoman, namedMistresse Ambrosia, Wife unto a rich Merchant, who was calledSignior Gasparuolo Sagastraccio, who had good knowledge of him, andrespectively used him. Loving this Gentlewoman with greatdiscretion, without the least apprehension of her husband: he sentupon a day to entreate conference with her, for enjoying thefruition of her love, and she should find him ready to fulfillwhatsoever she pleased to command him, as, at any time he would makegood his promise.

  • 约维蒂奇 08-06

       SHAME, BY DISGRACING THEM

  • 于业成 08-06

      Wonderfull crowds of people were then in the Church; and thisaccident being now noysed among the men, at length it came to herHusbands understanding, whose greefe was so great, as it exceededall capacity of expression. Afterward he declared what had hapned inhis house the precedent night, according as his wife had truly relatedto him, with all the speeches, which passed between Silvestra andJeronimo; by which discourse, they generally conceived, the certaineoccasion of both their sodaine deaths, which moved them to greatcompassion. Then taking the yong womans body, and ordering it as acoarse ought to be: they layed it on the same Biere by the yong man,and when they had sufficiently sorrowed for their disastrousfortune, they gave them honourable buriall both in. one grave. So,this poore couple, whom love (in life) could not joyne together, deathdid unite in an inseparable conjunction.

  • 刘长忠 08-05

    {  Then causing to be brought (for each of them) two goodly gowns orRobes (made after the Persian manner) the one lyned thorough withcloth of Gold, and the other with the costlyest Fur; not after suchfashion as Citizens or Marchants use to weare, but rather beseemingLords of greatest account, and three light under-wearing Cassocks orMandillions, of Carnatian Sattin, richly Imbroidred with Gold andPearles, and lined thorow with White Taffata, presenting these giftsto him, she sayd. I desire you Gentlemen to receive these meanetrifies, such as you see my Husband weares the like, and these otherbeside, considering you are so far from your Wives, having travailed along way already, and many miles more yet to overtake; alsoMarchants (being excellent men) affect to be comely and handsome intheir habits; although these are of slender value, yet (innecessity) they may do you service.

  • 袁振清 08-04

      This answere was very welcome to the Marquesse, as apparantlyperceiving hereby, that the dignity whereto hee had exalted her, orany particular favours beside, could not infect her with any pride,coynesse, or disdaine. Not long after, having told her in plaine andopen speeches, that his subjects could not endure her so late bornedaughter: he called a trusty servant of his, and having instructed himwhat he should doe, sent him to Grizelda, and he being alone with her,looking very sadde, and much perplexed in mind, he saide. Madame,except I intend to loose mine owne life, I must accomplish what myLord hath strictly enjoyned me, which is, to take this your yongdaughter, and then I must: So breaking off abruptly, the Ladyhearing his words, and noting his frowning lookes, remembring alsowhat the Marquesse himselfe had formerly said; she presently imagined,that he had commanded his servant to kill the childe. Suddenlytherefore, she tooke it out of the Cradle, and having sweetlykissed, and bestowne her blessing on it (albeit her heart throbbed,with the inward affection of a Mother) without any alteration ofcountenance, she tenderly laid it in the servants armes, and said.Here friend, take it, and doe with it as thy Lord and mine hathcommanded thee: but leave it in no rude place, where birds or savagebeasts may devour it, except it be his will to have it so.}

  • 姬贺 08-04

      VALIANT

  • 黄婷婷 08-04

      In that most blissefull state,

  • 陈瑞莹 08-03

       DIVERSITY OF OCCURRENCES, AND CONTRARY ACCIDENTS HAPPENING:

  • 陈国海 08-01

    {  When Supper was concluded, and the King and his Company remounted onhorsebacke: thankefully departing from Signior Neri, the King returnedto his lodging, concealing there closely his affection to himselfe,and whatsoever important affaires happened: yet he could not forgetthe beauty, and gracious behaviour of Genevera the faire (for whosesake he loved her Sister likewise) but became so linked to her invehement maner, as he had no power to think on any thing else.Pretending other urgent occasions, he fell into great familiarity withSignior Neri, visiting very often his goodly Garden; onely to seehis faire Daughter Genevera, the Adamant which drew him thither.

  • 杜汶泽 08-01

      Our Judge was now in a wofull perplexity, and confessing hisfolly, in marying a wife so young, and far unfit for his age andabilitie: being halfe desperate, sad and displeased, he came forthof the Chamber, using divers speeches to Pagamino, whereof he madelittle or no account at all: and in the end, without any othersuccesse, left his wife there, and returned home to Pisa. Therefurther afflictions fell upon him, because the people began toscorne him, demanding dayly of him, what was become of his gallantyoung wife, making hornes, with ridiculous pointings at him: wherebyhis sences became distracted, so that he ran raving about thestreetes, and afterward died in very miserable manner. Which newescame no sooner to the eare of Pagamino, but, in the honourableaffection hee bare to Bertolomea, he maried her, with great solemnity;banishing all Fasts, Vigils, and Lents from his house, and living withher in much felicity. Wherfore (faire Ladies) I am of opinion, thatBernardo of Geneway, in his disputation with Ambroginolo; might haveshewne himselfe a great deale wiser, and sparing his rash proceedingwith his wife.

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