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类型【址:a g 9 559⒐ v i p】1:黄如楷 大小:TQRs9ynv40458KB 下载:ebPeYUy414689次
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日期:2020-08-03 23:05:11
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1.【址:a g 9 559⒐ v i p】1  That findes no foe like ficklenesse?
2.  So a good wife and bad wife, a wand will make stirre.
3.  The Physitian interrupting him bashfully, turned himselfe untoBruno, saying. Did not I tell thee this before? Observe what a notablething it is, to speake well, and to frequent the company of theWise. A thousand other, meerely blockes and dullardes by Nature, couldnever so soone comprehend all the particularities of my knowledge,as this honest and apprehensive man hath done. Thou didst not searchinto it halfe so soone, nor (indeed) did I expresse a quarter of myingenuity to thee, as (since his comming) hath prodigally flownefrom me.
4.  Which cannot be exprest.
5.  Pedro di Vinciolo went to sup at a friends house in the City. Hiswife (in the meane while) had a young man whom shee loved, at supperwith Pedro returning home on a sodaine, the young man was hidden undera Coope for Hens. Pedro in excuse of his so soone comming home,declareth, how in the house of Herculano (with whom he should havesupt) a friend of his Wives was found, which was the reason of theSuppers breaking off. Pedroes Wife reproving the error ofHerculanoes wife, an Asse (by chance) treads on the yong mansfingers that lay hidden under the Hen-coope. Upon his crying out Pedrosteppeth thither, sees him, knowes him, and findeth the fallacy of hiswife; with whom (nevertbelesse) he groweth to agreement, in regardof some imperfections in himselfe.
6.  Which set my soule on fire, enflamde each part,

计划指导

1.  FORTUNE, THEN IN ANY REGARD OF THEIR DUTIFULL SERVICES
2.  When it was day, and all in the house risen, the hoast began tosmile at Panuccio, mocking him with his idle dreaming and talking inthe night.
3.  No sooner was he gone, but the Abbot beganne to consider withhimselfe, what he were best to doe in this case, either (in thepresence of all the other Monkes) to open the Chamber doore, that sothe offence being knowne to them all, they might have no occasion ofmurmuring against him, when he proceeded in the Monkes punishment;or rather should first understand of the Damosell her selfe, how,and in what manner shee was brought thither. Furthermore, heconsidered, that shee might be a woman of respect, or some such mansdaughter, as would not take it well, to have her disgraced beforeall the Monkes. Wherefore hee concluded, first to see (himselfe)what shee was, and then (afterward) to resolve upon the rest. So goingvery softly to the Chamber, and entring in, locked the doore fast withthe key, when the poore Damosell thinking it had beene the gallantyoung Monke; but finding it to be the Lord Abbot, shee fell on herknees weeping, as fearing now to receive publike shame, by beingbetrayed in this unkinde manner.
4.  In the mean while, by Lesca she sent the sound tooth to Pyrrhus, who(wondering not a little at her so many strange attempts, which heeurged so much the rather, as thinking their performance impossible,and in meere loyall duty to his Lord) seeing them all three to benotably effected; he made no further doubt of her intire love towardeshim, but sent her assurance likewise, of his readinesse andserviceable diligence, whensoever she would command him.
5.  THE FIRST DAY, THE SECOND NOVELL
6.  from his very youngest yeares, brought up to this instant in myCourt; wherein thou hast given me much affliction of minde, and sooverthrowne my senses, as I cannot well imagine how I should dealewith thee. For him, whom I have this night caused to be surprized,even as he came forth of your close contrived conveyance, anddetaine as my prisoner, I have resolved how to proceed with him: butconcerning thy selfe, mine oppressions are so many and violent, as Iknow not what to say of thee. e. way, thou hast meerly murthered theunfeigned affection I bare thee, as never any father could expressemore to his childe: and then againe, thou hast kindled a most justindignation in me, by thine immodest and wilfull folly, and whereasNature pleadeth pardon for the one, yet justice standeth up againstthe other, and urgeth cruell severity against thee: neverthelesse,before I will determine upon any resolution, I come purposely first toheare thee speake, and what thou canst say for thy selfe, in a badcase, so desperate and dangerous.

推荐功能

1.  When the Lady beheld the fruites and flowers, and heard many otherthinges recounted, so wonderfully growing in the same Garden: began torepent her rash promise made; yet notwithstanding her repentance, asWomen are covetous to see all rarities; so, accompanied with diversLadies and Gentlewomen more, she went to see the Garden; and havingcommended it with much admiration, she returned home againe, themost sorrowfull Woman as ever lived, considering what she had tyed herselfe to, for enjoying this Garden. So excessive grew her griefe andaffliction, that it could not be so clouded or concealed: but herHusband tooke notice of it, and would needs understand the occasionthereof. Long the Lady (in regard of shame and modesty) sate withoutreturning any answer; but being in the end constrained, she disclosdthe whol History to him.
2.  Deere Love, and my most worthily respected friend, I perceiveplainly and infallibly, that I am drawing neere unto my end, whichmuch discontenteth me; because my hope was to have lived longer inthis world, for the enjoying of your kinde and most esteemedcompany. Yet one thing maketh my death very pleasing and welcome tome; namely, that lying thus in my bed of latest comfort in thislife, I shall expire and finish my course, in the armes of those twopersons, whome I most affected in all this world, as you myever-deerest friend, and you faire Lady, whom (since the very firstsight of you) I loved and honoured in my soule. Irkesome and veriegreevous it is to me, that (if I dye) I shall leave you here astranger, without the counsaile and helpe of any bodie: and yet muchmore offensive would it become, if I had not such a friend as youheere present, who (I am faithfully perswaded) will have the like careand respect of her (even for my sake) as of my selfe, if time hadallotted my longer tarrying here. And therefore (worthy friend) mostearnestly I desire you, that if I dye, all mine affaires and she mayremaine to your trustie care, as being (by my selfe) absolutelycommended to your providence, and so to dispose both of the one andother, as may best agree with the comfort of my soule. As for you(choice beauty) I humbly entreate, that after my death you would notforget me, to the end, I may make my vaunt in another world, that Iwas affected here by the fairest Lady that ever Nature framed. If ofthese two things you will give mee assurance, I shall depart fromyou with no meane comfort.
3.  When they had rested themselves there for some few dayes, thesupposed Abbot, with the two Knights, and none else in company butAlessandro, went before the Pope, and having done him such reverenceas beseemed, the Abbot began to speake in this manner.
4.  The answer of Lisana pleased the Queene exceedingly, in findingher to be so wise and faire, as the King himself had before informedher: who instantly called for her Father and Mother, and knowingthey would be well pleased with whatsoever he did; he called for aproper yong Gentleman, but somewhat poore, being named Perdicano,and putting certaine Rings into his hand, which he refused not toreceive, caused him there to espouse Lisana. To whome the King gaveimmediately (besides Chaines and jewels of inestimable valew,delivered by the Queene to the Bride) Ceffala and Calatabelotta, twogreat territories abounding in divers wealthy possessions, saying toPerdicano. These wee give thee, as a dowry in marriage with thisbeautifull Maid, and greater gifts we will bestow on thee hereafter,as we shal perceive thy love and kindnesse to her.
5.   It will be (to morrow) fifteene dayes, since we departed from theCity of Florence, to come hither for our pastime and comfort, theconservation of our lives, and support of our health, by avoydingthose melanchollies, griefes and anguishes, which we beheld dayliein our City, since the pestilentiall visitation beganne there, wherein(by my judgement) we have done well and honestly. Albeit some lightNovels, perhaps attractive to a little wantonnes, as some say, and ourjoviall feasting with good cheare, singing and dancing, may seemematters inciting to incivility, especially in weake and shallowunderstandings. But I have neither seene, heard, or knowne, anyacte, word, or whatsoever else, either on your part or ours, justlydeserving to be blamed: but all has bin honest, as in a sweete andhermonious concord, such as might well beseeme the communitie ofBrethren and Sisters; which assuredly, as well in regard of you, asus, hath much contented me.
6.  Thus the mocked and derided Nicostratus, returned in againe with hisLady and Pyrrhus; where perhaps (although the Peare-tree was cutdowne) they could find as cunning meanes to over-reach him.

应用

1.  WHEREON, ALL THE DISCOURSES DO PASSE UNDER THE GOVERNMENT OF THE
2.  Madam Eliza having ended her compassionate discourse, which indeedehad moved all the rest to sighing; the Queene, who was faire, comelyof stature, and tarrying a very majesticall countenance, smilingmore familarly then the other, spake to them thus. It is verynecessary, that the promise made to Dioneus, should carefully be kept,and because now there remaineth none, to report any more Novels, butonely he and my selfe: I must first deliver mine, and he (who takes itfor an honour) to be the last in relating his owne, last let him befor his owne deliverance. Then pausing a little while, thus shebegan againe. Many times among vulgar people, it hath passed as acommon Proverbe: That the deceiver is often trampled on, by such as hehath deceived. And this cannot shew it selfe (by any reason) to betrue, except such accidents as awaite on treachery, doe really makea just discovery thereof. And therefore according to the course ofthis day observed, I am the woman that must make good what I havesaide for the approbation of that Proverbe: no way (I hope)distastfull to you in the hearing, but advantageable to preserve youfrom any such beguiling.
3.  This lost kinde of life in him, was no meane burthen of greefeunto his Noble Father, and all hope being already spent, of any futurehappy recovery, he gave command (because he would not alwaies havesuch a sorrow in his sight) that he should live at a Farme of his ownein a Country Village, among his Peazants and Plough-Swaines. Which wasnot any way distastefull to Chynon, but well agreed with his ownenaturall disposition; for their rurall qualities, and grosse behaviourpleased him beyond the Cities civility. Chynon living thus at hisFathers Countrey Village, exercising nothing else but ruralldemeanour, such as then delighted him above all other: it chanced upona day about the houre of noone, as hee was walking over the fields,with a long staffe on his necke, which commonly he used to carry; heentred in to a small thicket, reputed the goodliest in all thosequarters, and by reason it was then the month of May, the Trees hadtheir leaves fairely shot forth.
4、  During these passed accidents, the Pope had received intelligence ofthe Lord Abbots surprizall, which was not a little displeasing to him:but when he saw him returned, he demaunded, what benefit he receivedat the Bathes? Whereto the Abbot, merrily smyling, thus replyed.Holy Father, I met with a most skilfull Physitian neerer hand, whoseexperience is beyond the power of the Bathes, for by him I am veryperfectly cured: and so discoursed all at large. The Pope laughingheartely, and the Abbot continuing on still his report; moved withan high and magnificent courage, he demaunded one gracious favour ofthe Pope: who imagining that he would request a matter of greatermoment, then he did, freely offered to grant, whatsoever he desired.
5、  That I esteem'd all martyrdome was light

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网友评论(j7BT97wz78437))

  • 余熙鸣 08-02

      Signior Thorello, if with true affection you love your Wife, andmisdoubt her marriage to some other man: I protest unto you, by thesupreme powers, that you deserve no reprehension in any mannerwhatsoever. For, of all the Ladyes that ever I have seene, she isthe onely woman, whose carriage, vertues, and civile speaking (settingaside beauty, which is but a fading flowre) deserveth mostgraciously to be respected, much more to be affected in the highestdegree. It were to me no meane favour of our Gods, (seeing Fortunedirected your course so happily hither) that for the short or longtime we have to live, we might reigne equally together in theseKingdomes under my subjection. But if such grace may not be grantedme, yet, seeing it stands mainly upon the perill of your life, to beat Pavia againe by your own limitted time, it is my chiefestcomfort, that I am therewith acquainted, because I intended to haveyou conveighed thither, yea, even into your owne house, in suchhonourable order as your vertues doe justly merit, which in regardit cannot be so conveniently performed, but as I have already informedyou, and as the necessity of the case urgently commandeth; accept itas it may be best accomplished.

  • 柯尔曼 08-02

      It fortuned, that King Charles in the Summer time) for hispleasure and recreation, went to repose himselfe (for some certaynedayes) at Castello de Mare, where having heard report of the beautieand singularitie of Signiour Neries Garden; hee grew very desirousto see it. But when he understoode to whome it belonged, then heentred into consideration with himselfe, that hee was an ancientKnight, maintaining a contrarie faction to his: wherefore, hethought it fit to goe in some familiar manner, and with no trayneattending on him. Wherupon he sent him word, that he wold come tovisit him, with foure Gentlemen onely in his companie, meaning tosup with him in his Garden the next night ensuing. The newes wasvery welcome to Signior Neri, who took order in costly maner for allthings to bee done, entertaining the King most joyfully into hisbeautifull Garden.

  • 许青青 08-02

       The Soldane, being desirous to give Sicurano all manner ofsatisfaction, having followed the course so indistriously, bad himto produce the Woman, and hee was well contented. Whereat Bernardostoode much amazed, because he verity beleeved that she was dead.And Ambroginolo foreseeing already a preparation for punishment,feared, that the repayment of the money would not now serve his turne:not knowing also, what he should further hope or suspect, if the womanher selfe did personally appeare, which hee imagined would be amiracle. Sicurano having thus obtained the Soldanes permission,teares, humbling her selfe at his feete, in a moment she lost hermanly voyce and demeanour, as knowing that she was now no longer touse them, but must truly witnesse what she was indeed, and thereforethus spake.

  • 西哈萨 08-02

      Blaspheming thee

  • 潘燕燕 08-01

    {  WHEREIN IS MANIFESTED, THAT THE MALICE AND SUBTILTY OF

  • 蒋文 07-31

      BY ANY HUMANE POWER OR PROVIDENCE; ASPECIALLY IN SUCH}

  • 斯科拉里 07-31

      The dealings of Alessandro in England grew verie great, for hee lentout much money to many Gentlemen, Lords, and Barons of the Land,upon engagement of their Mannors; Castles, and other revennues: fromwhence he derived immeasurable benefite. While the three Brethren heldon in their lavish expences, borrowing moneys when they wanteduntill their supplies came from England, whereon (indeede) was theyronely dependance: it fortuned, that (contrary to the opinion of allmen) warre happened betweene the King of England, and one of hissonnes, which occasioned much trouble in the whole Countrey, by takingpart on either side, some with the sonne, and other with the Father.In regard whereof, those Castles and places pawned to Alessandro, weresodainely seized from him, nothing then remaining, that turned him anyprofite. But living in hope day by day, that peace would beconcluded betweene the Father and the Sonne, he never doubted, but allthings then should be restored to him, both the principall andinterest, and therfore he would not depart out of the Countrey.

  • 张家胜 07-31

      IN JUST SCORNE AND MOCKERY OF SUCH JEALOUS HUSBANDS, THAT WILL BE

  • 刘文华 07-30

       Commending her admirable constancy, exceliency of wit, and sprightlycourage, in making such a bold adventure; he kissed the two sweeteboyes, and to keepe his promise, whereto he was earnestlyimportuned, by all his best esteemed friends there present, especiallythe honourable Ladies, who would have no deniall, but by forgettinghis former harsh and uncivill carriage towards her, to accept herfor ever as his lawfull wife, folding her in his armes, and sweetlykissing her divers times together, he bad her welcome to him, as hisvertuous, loyall, and most loving wife, and so (for ever after) hewould acknowledge her. Well knew hee that she had store of betterbeseeming garments in the house, and therefore requested the Ladies towalke with her to her Chamber, to uncase her of those Pilgrimes weeds,and cloath her in her owne more sumptuous garments, even those whichshee wore on her wedding day, because that was not the day of hiscontentment, but onely this; for now he confessed her to be his wifeindeede, and now he would give the king thanks for her, and now wasCount Bertrand truly married to the faire Juliet of Narbona.

  • 道格拉斯-罗伯茨 07-28

    {  Master Simon the Physitian, by the perswasions of Bruno, Buffalmaco,and a third Companion, named Nello, made Calandrino to beleeve, thathe was conceived great with childe. And having Physicke ministred tohim for the disease: they got both good fatte Capons and money of him,and so cured him, without any other man of deliverance.

  • 吉士 07-28

      Here I am to tell you, that in the Campe or Army of theChristians, on the day when Saladine made his surprizal, there was aProvinciall Gentleman dead and buried, who was Signior Thorello deDignes, a man of very honourable and great esteeme, in which respect(Signior Thorello d'Istria, knowne throughout the Army, by hisNobility and valour) whosoever heard that Signior Thorello was dead:beleeved it to be Thorello d'Istria, and not he of Dignes, so thatThorello d'Istriaes unknowne surprizall and thraldome, made it also topasse for an assured truth.

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