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类型【址:a g 9 559⒐ v i p】1:林凤娇 大小:zftn7bKX56374KB 下载:OrgheMyW62621次
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日期:2020-08-04 02:04:13
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金大地

1.【址:a g 9 559⒐ v i p】1  These newes were very strange to them, and their imprisonment asunwelcome; and although they were truly inocent, either in knowledgeof the horrid fact, or the departure of Folco with Ninetta: yetbeing unable to endure the tortures extremity, they made themselvesculpable by confession, and that they had a hand with Folco in themurder of Magdalena. Upon this their forced confession, and sentenceof death pronounced on them by the Duke himselfe; before the dayappointed for their publike execution, by great summes of money, whichthey had closely hid in their House, to serve when any urgentextremitie should happen to them; they corrupted their keepers, andbefore any intelligence could be had of their flight, they escapedby Sea to Rhodes, where they lived afterward in great distresse andmisery. The just vengeance of Heaven followed after Folco and Ninetta,he for murthering his honest wife, and she for poysoning her offendingHusband: for being beaten a long while on the Seas, by tempestuousstormes and weather, and not admitted landing in any Port or creeke;they were driven backe on the Coast of Candie againe, where beingapprehended, and brought to the City before the Duke, they confessedtheir several notorious offences, and ended their loathed lives in onefire together.
2.  Ferando, by drinking a certaine kinde of powder, was buried dead.And by the Abbot, who was enamored of his Wife, was taken out of hisGrave, and put into a darke prison, where they made him beleeve,that hee was in Purgatorie. Afterward, when time came that heeshould be, raised to life againe; he was made to keepe a childewhich the Abbot had got by his Wife.
3.  Afterward, he demanded of him, how much displeasing to God hee hadbeene in the sinne of Gluttony? When (sighing againe greatly) heeanswered: Too much, and too often, good Father. For, over and besidethe Fasts of our Lent season, which everie yeare ought to bee duelyobserved by devout people, I brought my selfe to such a customarieuse, that I could fast three dayes in every Weeke, with Bread andWater. But indeede (holy Father) I confesse, that I have drunkewater with such a pleasing appetite and delight (especially inpraying, or walking on pilgrimages) even as greedy drunkards doe, indrinking good Wine. And many times I have desired such Sallades ofsmall hearbes, as Women do gather abroad in the open fields, andfeeding onely upon them, without coveting after any other kinde ofsustenance, hath seemed much more pleasing to me, then I thought toagree with the nature of Fasting, especially, when as it swervethfrom devotion, or is not done as it ought to bee.Sonne, Sonne, replied the Confessour, these sinnes are naturall,and very light, and therefore I would not have thee to charge thyconscience with them, more then is needfull. It happeneth to every man(how holy soever he be) that after he hath fasted overlong, feedingwill be welcome to him, and drinking good drinke after his travaile. OSir, (said Maister Chappelet) never tell me this to comfort me, forwell you know, and I am not ignorant therein, that such things asare done for the service of God, ought all to be performed purely, andwithout any blemish of the minde; what otherwise is done, savoureth ofsinne. The Friar being well contented with his words, said: It isnot amisse that thou understandest it in this manner, and thyconscience thus purely cleared, is no little comfort to me. But tellme now concerning Avarice, hast thou sinned therein, by desiringmore then was reasonable, or withholding from others, such things asthou oughtst not to detaine? Wherein Maister Chappelet answered.Good Father, I would not have you to imagine, because you see melodged heere in the house of two Usurers, that therefore I am of anysuch disposition. No truely Sir, I came hither to no other end, butonely to chastise and admonish them in friendly manner, to clensetheir mindes from such abhominable profit: And assuredly, I shouldhave prevailed therein, had not this violent sicknesse hindered mineintention. But understand (holy Father) that my parents left me a richman, and immediatly after my Fathers death, the greater part of hisgoods I gave away for Gods sake, and then, to sustaine mine owne life,and to helpe the poore members of Jesus Christ, I betooke my selfeto a meane estate of Merchandise, desiring none other then honestgaine thereby, and evermore whatsoever benefit came to me; Iimparted halfe thereof to the poore, converting mine owne smallportion about my necessary affaires, which that other part wouldscarcely serve to supply: yet alwayes God gave thereto such amercifull blessing, that my businesse dayly thrived more and more,arising still from good to better.
4.  mer two discoursers to part from: And there I will shew you, how aCitizen of ours, recovered the kindnesse of his Love, after hee hadlost it.
5.  TRULY NOBLE SOULE, CANNOT BE VIOLENCED OR CONFOUNDED, BY THE
6.  Thus Aniolliero, purposing to visite his Cousin the Cardinal likea Gallant, and at the Marquisate of Ancona, returned backe poorly inhis shirt unto Buonconvento, and durst not (for shame) repaire toSienna. In the end, he borrowed money on the other horse whichFortarigo rode on, and remained there in the Inne, whence riding toCorsignano, where he had divers Kinsmen and Friends, he continuedthere so long with them, till he was better furnished from his Father.

计划指导

1.  Having thus spoken, she fell to weeping, and then thus beganagain. Poore wretched woman as I am, in an unfortunate houre was Iborne, and in a much worse, when I was made thy Wife. I could have hada proper, handsome yong man; one, that would have maintained mee braveand gallantly: but, beast as I was, to forgoe my good, and cast myselfe away on such a beggar as thou art, and whom none wold havehad, but such an Asse as I. Other women live at hearts ease, and injollity, have their amorous friends and loving Paramours, yea, one,two, three at once, making their husbands looke like a Moone cressent,wheron they shine Sun-like, with amiable lookes, because they know nothow to helpe it: when I (poore foole) live heere at home a miserablelife, not daring once to dreame of such follies, an innocent soule,heartlesse and harmelesse.
2.  Now trust me Sir, answered Melisso, I am a native of Laiazzo, and asyou are vexed with one great mis-fortune, even so am I offended withanother. I am young, wealthy, well derived by birth, and allowliberall expences, for maintaining a worthy table in my house, withoutdistinguishing persons by their rancke and quality, but make it freefor all commers, both of the city, and all places els. Notwithstandingall which bounty and honourable entertainement, I cannot meet with anyman that loveth me. In which respect, I journey to the same place asyou doe, to crave the counsell of so wise a King, what I should doe,whereby I might procure men to love me. Thus like two well-metfriendly companions, they rode on together, untill they arrived inGreat Britaine, where, by meanes of the Noble Barons attending onthe King, they were brought before him. Melisso delivered his minde invery few words, whereto the King made no other answere, but this:Learne to love. Which was no sooner spoken, but Melisso wasdismissed from the Kings presence.
3.  Now was the Abbot (well neere) on the highest step of his hope,making her constant promise, to accomplish it: But (quoth he) whatshall be my recompence when I have done it? Father, saide she,whatsoever you please to aske, if it remaine within the compasse of mypower: but you being such a vertuous and sanctified man, and I a womanof so meane worth or merit; what sufficient recompence can I be ableto make you? Whereunto the Abbot thus replyed. Faire woman, you areable to do as much for me, as I am for you, because I doe dispose myselfe, to performe a matter for your comfort and consolation, evenso ought you to be as mindfull of me, in any action concerning my lifeand welfare. In any such matter Sir (quoth she) depending on yourbenefit so strictly, you may safely presume to command me. You mustthen (saide the Abbot) grant me your love, and the kinde embracingof your person; because so violent are mine affections, as I pineand consume away daily, till I enjoy the fruition of my desires, andnone can helpe me therein but you.When the woman heard these words, as one confounded with muchamazement, thus shee replied. Alas, holy Father! What a strange motionhave you made to me? I beleeved very faithfully, that you were nolesse then a Saint, and is it convenient, that when silly women cometo ask counsell of such sanctified men, they should returne themsuch unfitting answeres? Be not amazed good woman, saide the Abbot, atthe motion which I have made unto you, because holinesse is notthereby impaired a jot in me; for it is the inhabitant of the soule,the other is an imperfection attending on the body: but be itwhatsoever, your beauty hath so powerfully prevailed on me, thatentire love hath compelld me to let you know it. And more may youboast of your beauty, then any that ever I beheld before, considering,it is so pleasing to a sanctified man, that it can draw him fromdivine contemplations, to regard a matter of so humble an equalitie.
4.  To cheare my long dismay:
5.  After he had heard and observed all these things, he stoode awhile as confounded with feare and pitty, like a simple silly man,hoodwinkt with his owne passions, not knowing the subtle enemiescunning illusions in offering false suggestions to the sight, to workehis owne ends thereby, and encrease the number of his deceivedservants. Forthwith he perswaded himselfe, that he might make good useof this womans tormenting, so justly imposed on the Knight toprosecute, if thus it should continue still every Friday. Wherefore,setting a good note or marke upon the place, he returned backe tohis owne people, and at such time as he thought convenient, sent fordivers of his kindred and friends from Ravenna, who being present withhim, thus he spake to them.
6.  Is there no comfort in this wretchednesse?

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1.  In the nature and course of a Rover or Pirate, so put thence to sea,coasting all about Barbarie, robbing and spoyling such as he met with;who were of no greater strength then himselfe: wherein Fortune wasso favourable to him, that he became wealthy in a very short while.But as felicities are not alwayes permanent, so he and hisfollowers, not contenting themselves with sufficient riches: by greedyseeking to get more, happened to be taken by certaine ships of theSarazins, and so were robbed themselves of all that they had gotten,yet they resisted them stoutly a long while together, though it provedto the losse of many lives among them. When the Sarazens had sunke hisship in the Sea, they tooke him with them to Thunis, where he wasimprisoned, and lived in extreamest misery.
2.  for none other meete,
3.  Sir, I have heard of a certaine man, named Primasso, one skilfullylearned in the Grammar, and (beyond all other) a very witty andready versifier: in regard whereof, he was so much admired, andfarre renowned, that such as never saw him, but onely heard of him,could easily say, this is Primasso. It came to passe, that beingonce at Paris, in poore estate, as commonly he could light on nobetter fortune (because vertue is slenderly rewarded, by such ashave the greatest possessions) he heard much fame of the Abbot ofClugni, a man reputed (next to the Pope) to be the richest Prelateof the Church. Of him he heard wonderfull and magnificent matters,that he alwayes kept an open and hospitable Court, and never maderefusall of any (from whence soever hee came or went) but they dideate and drinke freely there; provided, that they came when theAbbot was set at the Table. Primasso hearing this, and being anearnest desirer to see magnificent and vertuous men, hee resolved togoe see this rare bounty of the Abbot, demanding how far he dwelt fromParis? Being answered, about some three Leagues thence. Primassomade account, that if he went on betimes in the morning, he shouldeasily reach thither before the houre for dinner.
4.  Gerbino, contrary to the former plighted faith of hisGrand-father, King Gulielmo, fought with a Ship at Sea, belonging tothe King of Thunis, to take away his Daughter, who was then in thesame Ship. Shee being slaine by them that had the possession of her,he likewise slew them; and afterward had his owne head smitten off.
5.   In that most blissefull state,
6.  The Marquesse of Saluzzo, named Gualtiero, being constrained bythe importunate solliciting of his Lords, and other inferiourpeople, to joyne himselfe in marriage; tooke a woman according tohis owne liking, called Grizelda, she being the daughter of a pooreCountriman, named Janiculo, by whom he had two children, which hepretended to be secretly murdered. Afterward, they being grown toyeres of more stature, and making shew of taking in marriage anotherwife, more worthy of his high degree and Calling: made a seemingpublique liking of his owne daughter, expulsing his wife Grizeldapoorely from him. But finding her incomparable patience; moredearely (then before) hee received her into favour againe, brought herhome to his owne Pallace, where (with her children) hee caused her andthem to be respectively honoured, in despight of all her adverseenemies.

应用

1.  THE THIRD DAY, THE NINTH NOVELL
2.  My teares do, etc.
3.  It is a matter of no meane difficulty (vertuous Ladies) for us totake intire knowledge of every thing we doe, because (as oftentimeshath bene observed) many men, imagining if they were rich, they shouldlive securely, and without any cares. And therefore, not onely havetheyr prayers and intercessions aimed at that end, but also theirstudies and daily endevours, without refusall of any paines orperils have not meanely expressed their hourely solicitude. Andalthough it hath happened accordingly to them, and their covetousdesires fully accomplished; yet at length they have mette with suchkinde people, who likewise thirsting after their wealthypossessions, have bereft them of life, being their kinde andintimate friends, before they attained to such riches. Some other,being of lowe and base condition, by adventuring in many skirmishesand foughten battels, trampling in the bloud of their brethren andfriends, have bene mounted to the soveraigne dignity of Kingdomes(beleeving that therein consisted the truest happinesse) but boughtwith the deerest price of their lives. For, beside their infinit caresand feares wherewith such greatnesse is continually attended, at theroyall Tables, they have drunke poyson in a Golden pot. Many otherin like manner (with most earnest appetite) have coveted beauty andbodily strength, not foreseeing with any judgement, that thesewishes were not without perill; when being endued with them, theyeither have bene the occasion of their death, or such a lingeringlamentable estate of life, as death were a thousand times more welcometo them.
4、  Then Rustico said: "Bless thee, my dear daughter; let us go atonce and put him in his place, that I may be at peace."
5、  Gossip Pietro holding the Candle, and the woman being prepared asJohn had appointed her, she bowed her selfe forwardes with her handsset to the ground, even as if she stood upon foure feete. First withhis hands he touched her head and face, saying, Heere is the goodlyhead of a Mule: then handling her disheveld haire, termed them thegoodly mane of a Mule. Afterwardes, touching the body, armes, legs,and feete, gave them all the apt names (for those parts) belongingto a Mule, nothing else remaining, but onely the forming of the taile,which when Pietro perceived, how John was preparing to fasten it on(having no way misliked all his former proceeding:) he called tohim, saying: Forbeare Gossippe John, my Mule shal have no taile atall, I am contented to have her without a taile.

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网友评论(QH0vB87m94153))

  • 周浑元 08-03

      When they had washed, and were seated at the Tables, dinner wasserved in most magnificent sort; so that if the Emperor himself hadbin there, he could not have bin more sumptuously served. And althoughSaladine and his Baschaes were very Noble Lords, and wonted to seematters of admiration: yet could they do no lesse now, but ratherexceeded in marvaile, considering the qualitie of the Knight, whomthey knew to bee a Citizen, and no Prince or great Lord. Dinnerbeing ended, and divers familiar conferences passing amongst them:because it was exceeding hot, the Gentlemen of Pavia (as it pleasedThorello to appoint) went to repose themselves awhile, and hekeeping company with his three guests, brought them into a goodlyChamber, where, because he would not faile in the least scruple ofcourtesie, or conceale from them the richest jewell which he had; hesent for his Lady and wife, because (as yet) they had not seene her.

  • 程慧瑜 08-03

      Now, it came to passe, that about the beginning of May, it beingthen a very milde and serrene season, and he leading there a much moremagnificent life, then ever hee had done before, inviting divers todine with him this day, and as many to morrow, and not to leave himtill after supper: upon the sodaine, falling into remembrance of hiscruell Mistris, hee commanded all his servants to forbeare hiscompany, and suffer him to walke alone by himselfe awhile, becausehe had occasion of private meditations, wherein he would not (by anymeanes) be troubled. It was then about the ninth houre of the day, andhe walking on solitary all alone, having gone some halfe milesdistance from his Tents, entred into a Grove of Pine-trees, neverminding dinner time, or any thing else, but onely the unkind requitallof his love.

  • 刘小楠 08-03

       WHEREON, UNDER THE GOVERNMENT OF PAMPHILUS, THE SEVERALL

  • 蒋丰 08-03

      Bertolomea turning towards him, and seeming as if shee smiled to herselfe, thus answered. Sir, speake you to me? Advise your selfe well,least you mistake me for some other, for mine owne part, I never sawyou till now. How now quoth Ricciardo? Consider better what you say,looke more circumspectly on me, and then you will remember, that Iam your loving husband, and my name is Ricciardo di Cinzica. Youmust pardon me Sir, replyed Bertolomea, I know it not so fitting for amodest; woman to stand gazing in the faces of men: and let me lookeuppon you never so often, certaine I am, that (till this instant) Ihave not seene you. My Lord Judge conceived in his minde, that thusshe denied all knowledge of him, as standing in feare of Pagamino, andwould not confesse him in his presence. Wherefore hee entreated ofPagamino, to affoord him so much favour, that he might speake alonewith her in her Chamber. Pagamino answered, that he was well contentedtherewith, provided, that he should not kisse her against her will.Then he requested Bartolomea, to goe with him alone into herChamber, there to heare what he could say, and to answere him asshee found occasion. When they were come into the Chamber, and nonethere present but he and shee, Signior Ricciardo began in this manner.Heart of my heart, life of my life, the sweetest hope that I have inthis world; wilt thou not know thine owne Ricciardo, who loveth theemore then he doth himselfe? Why art thou so strange? Am I sodisfigured, that thou knowest me not? Behold me with a more pleasingeye, I pray thee.

  • 周明作 08-02

    {  It came to passe within a while after, that on a time, (about highnoone) Sir Simon being walking abroad, chanced to meete withBentivegna, driving an Asse before him, laden with divers commodities,and demaunding of him, whither he went, Bentivegna, thus answered.In troth Sir Simon, I am going to the City, about some especiallbusinesse of mine owne, and I carry these things to SigniorBonacorci da Ginestreto, because he should helpe me before theJudge, when I shall be called in question concerning my patrimony. SirSimon looking merily on him, said. Thou doest well Bentivegna, to makea friend sure before thou need him; goe, take my blessing with thee,and returne againe with good successe. But if thou meet with Laguccio,or Naldino, forget not to tell them, that they must bring me myshooe-tyes before Sunday. Bentivegna said, hee would discharge hiserrand, and so parted from him, driving his Asse on towards Florence.

  • 王汉军 08-01

      Worthy Ladies, it exceedeth the power of my capacitie, to censure inthe case whereof I am to speake, by saying, who sinned most, eitherNature, in seating a Noble soule in a vile body, or Fortune, inbestowing on a body (beautified with a noble soule) a base or wretchedcondition of life. As we may observe by Cistio, a Citizen of our owne,and many more beside; for, this Cistio beeing endued with a singulargood spirit, Fortune hath made him no better then a Baker. And beleeveme Ladies, I could (in this case) lay as much blame on Nature, as onFortune; if I did not know Nature to be most absolutely wise, and thatFortune hath a thousand eyes, albeit fooles have figured her to beeblinde. But, upon more mature and deliberate consideration, I finde,that they both (being truly wise and judicious) have dealt justly,in imitation of our best advised mortals, who being uncertaine of suchinconveniences, as may happen unto them, do bury (for their ownbenefit) the very best and choicest things of esteeme, in the mostvile and abject places of their houses, as being subject to leastsuspition, and where they may be sure to have them at all times, forsupply of any necessitie whatsoever, because so base a conveyance hathbetter kept them, then the very best chamber in the house could havedone. Even so these two great commanders of the world, do many timeshide their most precious Jewels of worth, under the clouds of Artsor professions of worst estimation, to the end, that fetching themthence when neede requires, their splendor may appeare to be themore glorious. Nor was any such matter noted in our homely BakerCistio, by the best observation of Messer Geri Spina, who was spokenof in the late repeated Novell, as being the husband to Madame Oretta;whereby this accident came to my remembrance, and which (in a shortTale) I will relate unto you.}

  • 黄仰东 08-01

      ESPECIALL HONOURABLE VERTUE, PERSEVERING AND DWELLING IN A

  • 陈焕枝 08-01

      And all in honour of the Spring.

  • 和晓莹 07-31

       SUCCESSEFULL IN THEIR LOVE, AFTER MANY HARD AND

  • 刘孙谋 07-29

    {  In the Spring season, etc.

  • 李侑菲 07-29

      Madame Beritola Caracalla, was found in an Island with two Goates,having lost her two Sonnes, and thence travailed into Lunigiana: whereone of her Sonnes became servant to the Lord thereof, and was foundsomewhat overfamiliar with his Masters daughter, who thereforecaused him to be imprisoned. Afterward, when the country of Sicelyrebelled against King Charles, the aforesaid Sonne chanced to beeknowne by his Mother, and was married to his Masters daughter. And hisBrother being found likewise, they both returned to great estate andcredit.

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