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类型【址:a g 9 559⒐ v i p】1:马茨·布伦斯特伦 大小:SoXgkDpS31624KB 下载:7JBFFKT459265次
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日期:2020-08-07 14:42:17
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1.【址:a g 9 559⒐ v i p】1  With these words she made her mistress leave off crying, and driedthe tears from her eyes. Penelope washed her face, changed herdress, and went upstairs with her maids. She then put some bruisedbarley into a basket and began praying to Minerva.
2.  Aegyptius, a man bent double with age, and of infinite experience,the first to speak His son Antiphus had gone with Ulysses to Ilius,land of noble steeds, but the savage Cyclops had killed him whenthey were all shut up in the cave, and had cooked his last dinnerfor him, He had three sons left, of whom two still worked on theirfather's land, while the third, Eurynomus, was one of the suitors;nevertheless their father could not get over the loss of Antiphus, andwas still weeping for him when he began his speech.
3.  When he was in this plight, Ino daughter of Cadmus, also calledLeucothea, saw him. She had formerly been a mere mortal, but hadbeen since raised to the rank of a marine goddess. Seeing in whatgreat distress Ulysses now was, she had compassion upon him, and,rising like a sea-gull from the waves, took her seat upon the raft.
4.  "The man who had seduced her then said, 'Would you like to comealong with us to see the house of your parents and your parentsthemselves? They are both alive and are said to be well off.'
5.  "Aldermen and town councillors of the Phaeacians, let Demodocuscease his song, for there are those present who do not seem to likeit. From the moment that we had done supper and Demodocus began tosing, our guest has been all the time groaning and lamenting. He isevidently in great trouble, so let the bard leave off, that we may allenjoy ourselves, hosts and guest alike. This will be much more as itshould be, for all these festivities, with the escort and the presentsthat we are making with so much good will, are wholly in his honour,and any one with even a moderate amount of right feeling knows that heought to treat a guest and a suppliant as though he were his ownbrother.
6.  Meanwhile lovely Polycaste, Nestor's youngest daughter, washedTelemachus. When she had washed him and anointed him with oil, shebrought him a fair mantle and shirt, and he looked like a god as hecame from the bath and took his seat by the side of Nestor. When theouter meats were done they drew them off the spits and sat down todinner where they were waited upon by some worthy henchmen, who keptpouring them out their wine in cups of gold. As soon as they had hadhad enough to eat and drink Nestor said, "Sons, put Telemachus'shorses to the chariot that he may start at once."

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1.  On this he took his leave, and Calypso went out to look for Ulysses,for she had heard Jove's message. She found him sitting upon the beachwith his eyes ever filled with tears, and dying of sheerhome-sickness; for he had got tired of Calypso, and though he wasforced to sleep with her in the cave by night, it was she, not he,that would have it so. As for the day time, he spent it on the rocksand on the sea-shore, weeping, crying aloud for his despair, andalways looking out upon the sea. Calypso then went close up to himsaid:
2.  "My friend," replied Ulysses, "you are very positive, and veryhard of belief about your master's coming home again, nevertheless Iwill not merely say, but will swear, that he is coming. Do not give meanything for my news till he has actually come, you may then give me ashirt and cloak of good wear if you will. I am in great want, but Iwill not take anything at all till then, for I hate a man, even as Ihate hell fire, who lets his poverty tempt him into lying. I swearby king Jove, by the rites of hospitality, and by that hearth ofUlysses to which I have now come, that all will surely happen as Ihave said it will. Ulysses will return in this self same year; withthe end of this moon and the beginning of the next he will be hereto do vengeance on all those who are ill treating his wife and son."
3.  While he was thus in two minds Helen came down from her high vaultedand perfumed room, looking as lovely as Diana herself. Adraste broughther a seat, Alcippe a soft woollen rug while Phylo fetched her thesilver work-box which Alcandra wife of Polybus had given her.Polybus lived in Egyptian Thebes, which is the richest city in thewhole world; he gave Menelaus two baths, both of pure silver, twotripods, and ten talents of gold; besides all this, his wife gaveHelen some beautiful presents, to wit, a golden distaff, and asilver work-box that ran on wheels, with a gold band round the topof it. Phylo now placed this by her side, full of fine spun yarn,and a distaff charged with violet coloured wool was laid upon thetop of it. Then Helen took her seat, put her feet upon thefootstool, and began to question her husband.
4.  As he was thus speaking a bird flew on his right hand- an eagle witha great white goose in its talons which it had carried off from thefarm yard- and all the men and women were running after it andshouting. It came quite close up to them and flew away on theirright hands in front of the horses. When they saw it they were glad,and their hearts took comfort within them, whereon Pisistratus said,"Tell me, Menelaus, has heaven sent this omen for us or for you?"
5.  Minerva led the way and Telemachus followed her. Presently she said,"Telemachus, you must not be in the least shy or nervous; you havetaken this voyage to try and find out where your father is buriedand how he came by his end; so go straight up to Nestor that we maysee what he has got to tell us. Beg of him to speak the truth, andhe will tell no lies, for he is an excellent person."
6.  "Thus he spoke, and the Achaeans feared no more. The daughters ofthe old man of the sea stood round you weeping bitterly, and clothedyou in immortal raiment. The nine muses also came and lifted uptheir sweet voices in lament- calling and answering one another; therewas not an Argive but wept for pity of the dirge they chaunted. Daysand nights seven and ten we mourned you, mortals and immortals, but onthe eighteenth day we gave you to the flames, and many a fat sheepwith many an ox did we slay in sacrifice around you. You were burnt inraiment of the gods, with rich resins and with honey, while heroes,horse and foot, clashed their armour round the pile as you wereburning, with the tramp as of a great multitude. But when the flamesof heaven had done their work, we gathered your white bones atdaybreak and laid them in ointments and in pure wine. Your motherbrought us a golden vase to hold them- gift of Bacchus, and work ofVulcan himself; in this we mingled your bleached bones with those ofPatroclus who had gone before you, and separate we enclosed also thoseof Antilochus, who had been closer to you than any other of yourcomrades now that Patroclus was no more.

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1.  "You want to know,' said he, 'about your return home, but heavenwill make this hard for you. I do not think that you will escape theeye of Neptune, who still nurses his bitter grudge against you forhaving blinded his son. Still, after much suffering you may get homeif you can restrain yourself and your companions when your shipreaches the Thrinacian island, where you will find the sheep andcattle belonging to the sun, who sees and gives ear to everything.If you leave these flocks unharmed and think of nothing but of gettinghome, you may yet after much hardship reach Ithaca; but if you harmthem, then I forewarn you of the destruction both of your ship andof your men. Even though you may yourself escape, you will return inbad plight after losing all your men, [in another man's ship, andyou will find trouble in your house, which will be overrun byhigh-handed people, who are devouring your substance under the pretextof paying court and making presents to your wife.
2.  "When the child of morning, rosy-fingered Dawn, appeared, he againlit his fire, milked his goats and ewes, all quite rightly, and thenlet each have her own young one; as soon as he had got through withall his work, he clutched up two more of my men, and began eating themfor his morning's meal. Presently, with the utmost ease, he rolled thestone away from the door and drove out his sheep, but he at once putit back again- as easily as though he were merely clapping the lidon to a quiver full of arrows. As soon as he had done so he shouted,and cried 'Shoo, shoo,' after his sheep to drive them on to themountain; so I was left to scheme some way of taking my revenge andcovering myself with glory.
3.  "Here I am, my dear sir," said he, "stay your hand therefore, andtell your father, or he will kill me in his rage against the suitorsfor having wasted his substance and been so foolishly disrespectful toyourself."
4.  "The men were in despair at this, and Eurylochus at once gave mean insolent answer. 'Ulysses,' said he, 'you are cruel; you are verystrong yourself and never get worn out; you seem to be made of iron,and now, though your men are exhausted with toil and want of sleep,you will not let them land and cook themselves a good supper upon thisisland, but bid them put out to sea and go faring fruitlessly onthrough the watches of the flying night. It is by night that the windsblow hardest and do so much damage; how can we escape should one ofthose sudden squalls spring up from South West or West, which so oftenwreck a vessel when our lords the gods are unpropitious? Now,therefore, let us obey the of night and prepare our supper here hardby the ship; to-morrow morning we will go on board again and put outto sea.'
5.   And Telemachus answered, "I will tell you truly everything. There isno emnity between me and my people, nor can I complain of brothers, towhom a man may look for support however great his quarrel may be. Jovehas made us a race of only sons. Laertes was the only son ofArceisius, and Ulysses only son of Laertes. I am myself the only sonof Ulysses who left me behind him when he went away, so that I havenever been of any use to him. Hence it comes that my house is in thehands of numberless marauders; for the chiefs from all theneighbouring islands, Dulichium, Same, Zacynthus, as also all theprincipal men of Ithaca itself, are eating up my house under thepretext of paying court to my mother, who will neither say point blankthat she will not marry, nor yet bring matters to an end, so theyare making havoc of my estate, and before long will do so withmyself into the bargain. The issue, however, rests with heaven. But doyou, old friend Eumaeus, go at once and tell Penelope that I am safeand have returned from Pylos. Tell it to herself alone, and thencome back here without letting any one else know, for there are manywho are plotting mischief against me."
6.  Eumaeus was frightened at the outcry they all raised, so he putthe bow down then and there, but Telemachus shouted out at him fromthe other side of the cloisters, and threatened him saying, "FatherEumaeus, bring the bow on in spite of them, or young as I am I willpelt you with stones back to the country, for I am the better man ofthe two. I wish I was as much stronger than all the other suitors inthe house as I am than you, I would soon send some of them off sickand sorry, for they mean mischief."

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1.  "What, my dear, are you talking about?" replied her father, "did younot send him there yourself, because you thought it would help Ulyssesto get home and punish the suitors? Besides, you are perfectly able toprotect Telemachus, and to see him safely home again, while thesuitors have to come hurry-skurrying back without having killed him."
2.  "Then send him away," said Mercury, "or Jove will be angry withyou and punish you"'
3.  On this Telemachus strode off through the yards, brooding hisrevenge upon the When he reached home he stood his spear against abearing-post of the cloister, crossed the stone floor of thecloister itself, and went inside.
4、  To this Penelope replied, "Eurymachus, heaven robbed me of all mybeauty whether of face or figure when the Argives set sail for Troyand my dear husband with them. If he were to return and look aftermy affairs, I should both be more respected and show a better presenceto the world. As it is, I am oppressed with care, and with theafflictions which heaven has seen fit to heap upon me. My husbandforesaw it all, and when he was leaving home he took my right wrist inhis hand- 'Wife, 'he said, 'we shall not all of us come safe homefrom Troy, for the Trojans fight well both with bow and spear. Theyare excellent also at fighting from chariots, and nothing decidesthe issue of a fight sooner than this. I know not, therefore,whether heaven will send me back to you, or whether I may not fallover there at Troy. In the meantime do you look after things here.Take care of my father and mother as at present, and even more soduring my absence, but when you see our son growing a beard, thenmarry whom you will, and leave this your present home. This is what hesaid and now it is all coming true. A night will come when I shallhave to yield myself to a marriage which I detest, for Jove hastaken from me all hope of happiness. This further grief, moreover,cuts me to the very heart. You suitors are not wooing me after thecustom of my country. When men are courting a woman who they thinkwill be a good wife to them and who is of noble birth, and when theyare each trying to win her for himself, they usually bring oxen andsheep to feast the friends of the lady, and they make hermagnificent presents, instead of eating up other people's propertywithout paying for it."
5、  "Thus spoke Eurylochus, and the men approved his words. I saw thatheaven meant us a mischief and said, 'You force me to yield, for youare many against one, but at any rate each one of you must take hissolemn oath that if he meet with a herd of cattle or a large flockof sheep, he will not be so mad as to kill a single head of either,but will be satisfied with the food that Circe has given us.'

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  • 迈克尔·威尔金森 08-06

      Then Minerva said, "Father, son of Saturn, King of kings, itserved Aegisthus right, and so it would any one else who does as hedid; but Aegisthus is neither here nor there; it is for Ulysses thatmy heart bleeds, when I think of his sufferings in that lonelysea-girt island, far away, poor man, from all his friends. It is anisland covered with forest, in the very middle of the sea, and agoddess lives there, daughter of the magician Atlas, who looks afterthe bottom of the ocean, and carries the great columns that keepheaven and earth asunder. This daughter of Atlas has got hold ofpoor unhappy Ulysses, and keeps trying by every kind of blandishmentto make him forget his home, so that he is tired of life, and thinksof nothing but how he may once more see the smoke of his own chimneys.You, sir, take no heed of this, and yet when Ulysses was before Troydid he not propitiate you with many a burnt sacrifice? Why then shouldyou keep on being so angry with him?"

  • 冯后祥 08-06

      "Alcinous," answered Ulysses, "there is a time for makingspeeches, and a time for going to bed; nevertheless, since you sodesire, I will not refrain from telling you the still sadder tale ofthose of my comrades who did not fall fighting with the Trojans, butperished on their return, through the treachery of a wicked woman.

  • 龚琳娜 08-06

       "I know, Eurynome," replied Penelope, "that you mean well, but donot try and persuade me to wash and to anoint myself, for heavenrobbed me of all my beauty on the day my husband sailed; nevertheless,tell Autonoe and Hippodamia that I want them. They must be with mewhen I am in the cloister; I am not going among the men alone; itwould not be proper for me to do so."

  • 吕伟 08-06

      "Thus did he pray, and Neptune heard his prayer. Then he picked up arock much larger than the first, swung it aloft and hurled it withprodigious force. It fell just short of the ship, but was within alittle of hitting the end of the rudder. The sea quaked as the rockfell into it, and the wash of the wave it raised drove us onwards onour way towards the shore of the island.

  • 刘振东 08-05

    {  "Maids, servants of Ulysses who has so long been absent, go to thequeen inside the house; sit with her and amuse her, or spin, andpick wool. I will hold the light for all these people. They may staytill morning, but shall not beat me, for I can stand a great deal."

  • 佐佐木更三 08-04

      To this you answered, O swineherd Eumaeus, "If these Achaeans,Madam, would only keep quiet, you would be charmed with the history ofhis adventures. I had him three days and three nights with me in myhut, which was the first place he reached after running away fromhis ship, and he has not yet completed the story of his misfortunes.If he had been the most heaven-taught minstrel in the whole world,on whose lips all hearers hang entranced, I could not have been morecharmed as I sat in my hut and listened to him. He says there is anold friendship between his house and that of Ulysses, and that hecomes from Crete where the descendants of Minos live, after havingbeen driven hither and thither by every kind of misfortune; he alsodeclares that he has heard of Ulysses as being alive and near athand among the Thesprotians, and that he is bringing great wealth homewith him."}

  • 范崇政 08-04

      "When I had set sail thence the wind took me first to Ismarus, whichis the city of the Cicons. There I sacked the town and put thepeople to the sword. We took their wives and also much booty, which wedivided equitably amongst us, so that none might have reason tocomplain. I then said that we had better make off at once, but mymen very foolishly would not obey me, so they stayed there drinkingmuch wine and killing great numbers of sheep and oxen on the seashore. Meanwhile the Cicons cried out for help to other Cicons wholived inland. These were more in number, and stronger, and they weremore skilled in the art of war, for they could fight, either fromchariots or on foot as the occasion served; in the morning, therefore,they came as thick as leaves and bloom in summer, and the hand ofheaven was against us, so that we were hard pressed. They set thebattle in array near the ships, and the hosts aimed theirbronze-shod spears at one another. So long as the day waxed and it wasstill morning, we held our own against them, though they were morein number than we; but as the sun went down, towards the time when menloose their oxen, the Cicons got the better of us, and we lost halfa dozen men from every ship we had; so we got away with those thatwere left.

  • 徐弘廷 08-04

      They were astounded when they heard this, for they had made surethat Telemachus had not gone to the city of Neleus. They thought hewas only away somewhere on the farms, and was with the sheep, orwith the swineherd; so Antinous said, "When did he go? Tell metruly, and what young men did he take with him? Were they freemen orhis own bondsmen- for he might manage that too? Tell me also, didyou let him have the ship of your own free will because he askedyou, or did he take it without yourleave?"

  • 耿标 08-03

       "My father is dead and gone," answered Telemachus, "and even if somerumour reaches me I put no more faith in it now. My mother does indeedsometimes send for a soothsayer and question him, but I give hisprophecyings no heed. As for the stranger, he was Mentes, son ofAnchialus, chief of the Taphians, an old friend of my father's." Butin his heart he knew that it had been the goddess.

  • 萧榕 08-01

    {TELL ME, O MUSE, of that ingenious hero who travelled far and wideafter he had sacked the famous town of Troy. Many cities did he visit,and many were the nations with whose manners and customs he wasacquainted; moreover he suffered much by sea while trying to savehis own life and bring his men safely home; but do what he might hecould not save his men, for they perished through their own sheerfolly in eating the cattle of the Sun-god Hyperion; so the godprevented them from ever reaching home. Tell me, too, about allthese things, O daughter of Jove, from whatsoever source you mayknow them.

  • 黄敬文 08-01

      "I will tell you all about them," replied Eumaeus, "Laertes is stillliving and prays heaven to let him depart peacefully his own house,for he is terribly distressed about the absence of his son, and alsoabout the death of his wife, which grieved him greatly and aged himmore than anything else did. She came to an unhappy end through sorrowfor her son: may no friend or neighbour who has dealt kindly by mecome to such an end as she did. As long as she was still living,though she was always grieving, I used to like seeing her and askingher how she did, for she brought me up along with her daughterCtimene, the youngest of her children; we were boy and girltogether, and she made little difference between us. When, however, weboth grew up, they sent Ctimene to Same and received a splendiddowry for her. As for me, my mistress gave me a good shirt and cloakwith a pair of sandals for my feet, and sent me off into thecountry, but she was just as fond of me as ever. This is all over now.Still it has pleased heaven to prosper my work in the situationwhich I now hold. I have enough to eat and drink, and can findsomething for any respectable stranger who comes here; but there is nogetting a kind word or deed out of my mistress, for the house hasfallen into the hands of wicked people. Servants want sometimes to seetheir mistress and have a talk with her; they like to have somethingto eat and drink at the house, and something too to take back withthem into the country. This is what will keep servants in a goodhumour."

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