վҳʱ ƾ̨ ۵ Ļ Ƶ֪ʶȨ

:ص㣡2020ũô

2020-08-04 11:39:25  Դձ
 

ַ:a g 9 559 v i p

Angelina making little or no account of such a losse, entreated themfor charities sake, to conduct her to that Castle, which accordinglythey did, and arrived there betweene seven and eight of the clock. TheCastle belonged to one of the Orsini, being called, Liello di Campo diFiore, and by great good fortune, his wife was then there, she being avery vertuous and religious Lady. No sooner did she looke uponAngelina, but she knew her immediately, and entertaining her verywillingly, requested, to know the reason of her thus arriving there:which she at large related, and moved the Lady (who likewise knewPedro perfectly well) to much compassion, because he was a kinsman anddeare friend to her Husband; and understanding how the Theeves hadsurprized him, she feared, that he was slaine among them, whereuponshe spake thus to Angelina. Seeing you know not what is become of mykinsman Pedro, you shall remaine here with me, untill such time, as(if we heare no other tidings of him) you may with safety be sentbacke to Rome.

𣨲廭

But, as excesse of delight is the Nurse to negligence, and begettethsuch an overpresuming boldnesse, as afterward proveth to be saucedwith repentance: so came it to passe with our over-fond Lovers, inbeing taken tardy through their owne folly. After they had manytimes met in this manner, the nights (according to the season) growingshorter and shorter, which their stolne delight made them lesserespective of, then was requisite in an adventure so dangerous: itfortuned, that their amorous pleasure had so farre transported them,and dulled their senses in such sort, by these their continuallnightly watchings; that they both fell fast asleepe, he having hishand closed in hers, and she one arme folded about his body, andthus they slept till broade day light. Old Messer Lizio, whocontinually was the morning Cocke to the whole House, going foorthinto his Garden, saw how his Daughter and Ricciardo were seated at thewindow. In he went againe, and going to his wives Chamber, saide toher. Rise quickly wife, and you shall see, what made your Daughterso desirous to lodge in the Garden Gallery. I perceive that shee lovedto heare the Nightingale, for she hath caught one, and holds himfast in her hand. Is it possible, saide the Mother, that ourDaughter should catch a live Nightingale in the darke? You shall seethat your selfe, answered Messer Lizio, if you will make hast, andgo with me.She, putting on her garments in great haste, followed her Husband,and being come to the Gallery doore, he opened it very softly, andgoing to the window, shewed her how they both sate fast asleepe, andin such manner as hath bene before declared: whereupon, sheeperceiving how Ricciardo and Catharina had both deceived her, wouldhave made an outcry, but that Messer Lizio spake thus to her. Wife, asyou love me, speake not a word, neither make any noyse: for, seeingshee hath loved Ricciardo without our knowledge, and they have hadtheir private meetings in this manner, yet free from any blamefuimputation; he shall enjoy her, and she him. Ricciardo is a Gentleman,well derived, and of rich possessions, it can be no disparagement tous, that Catharina match with him in mariage, which he neithershall, or dare deny to do, in regard of our Lawes severity; forclimbing up to my window with his Ladder of Ropes, whereby his life isforfeited to the Law, except our Daughter please to spare it, as itremaineth in her power to doe, by accepting him as her husband, oryeelding his life up to the Law, which surely she will not suffer,their love agreeing together in such mutuall manner, and headventuring so dangerously for her. Madam Jaquemina, perceiving thather husband spake very reasonably, and was no more offended at thematter; stept side with him behinde the drawne Curtaines, untillthey should awake of themselves. At the last, Ricciardo awaked, andseeing it was so farre in the day, thought himselfe halfe dead, andcalling to Catharina, saide.

Somtime (faire Ladies) there lived in Arimino, a Merchant, very richin wealth and worldly possessions, who having a beautifull Gentlewomanto his wife, he became extreamly jelous of her. And he had no otherreason for this foolish conceit; but, like as he loved hir dearly, andfound her to be very absolutely faire: even so he imagined, thatalthogh she devised by her best meanes to give him content; yet otherswould grow enamored of her, because she appeared so amiable to al.In which respect, time might tutor her to affect some other besidehimselfe: the onely common argument of every bad minded man, beingweake and shallow in his owne understanding. This jelous humorincreasing in him more and more, he kept her in such narrow restraint:that many persons condemned to death, have enoyed larger libertie intheir imprisonment. For, she might not bee present at Feasts,Weddings, nor goe to Church, or so much as to be seen at her doore:Nay, she durst not stand in her Window, nor looke out of her house,for any occasion whatsoever. By means whereof, life seemed mosttedious and offensive to her, and she supported it the moreimpatiently, because shee knew her selfe not any way faulty.

But Love, from whose bright discerning eies, nothing can be soclosely concealed, but at the length it commeth to light, had madethis amorous Lady mindefull thereof, and because she would not bediscovered in her intention, many dayes together, her soule becameperplexed; by what meanes that strong doore might best be opened,before she could compasse to performe it. But after that she had foundout the way, and gone downe her selfe alone into the cave; observingthe loope-light and had made it commodious for her purpose, she gaveknowledge thereof to Guiscardo, to have him devise an apt course forhis descent, acquainting him truly with the height, and how farre itwas distant from the ground within. After he had found thesouspirall in the hils side, and given it a larger entrance for hissafer passage; he provided a Ladder of cords, with steppessufficient for his descending and ascending, as also a wearing sutemade of leather, to keepe his skinne unscrached of the thornes, and toavoyde all suspition of his resorting thither. In this manner wenthe to the saide loope-hole the night following, and having fastenedthe one end of his corded ladder, to the strong stumpe of a tree beingby it; by meanes of the saide ladder, descended downe into the cave,and there attended the comming of his Lady.

ɻ

Which being done, he commanded that Thorello (who wasindifferently recovered) should be attyred in one of his ownesumptuous Saracine Roabes, the very fairest and richest that everwas seene, and on his head a Majesticall Turbant, after the mannerof his owne wearing, and the houre appearing to be somewhat late, hewith many of his best Baschaes, went to the Chamber where Thorellowas, and sitting downe a while by him, in teares thus he spake.Signior Thorello, the houre for sundering you and me, is now veryneere, and because I cannot beare you company, in regard of thebusinesse you goe about, and which by no meanes will admit it: I am totake my leave of you in this Chamber, and therefore am purposelycome to doe it. But before I bid you farewell, let me entreat you,by the love and friendship confirmed betweene us, to be mindfull ofme, and to take such order (your affaires being fully finished inLombardie) that I may once more enjoy the sight of you here, for amutuall solace and satisfaction of our mindes, which are now dividedby this urgent hast. Till which may be granted, let me want novisitation of your kind letters, commanding thereby of me,whatsoever here can possibly be done for you: assuring your selfe,no man living can command me as you doe.

Jehannot hearing these words, became exceeding sorrowfull, and saydwithin himselfe; I have lost all the paines which I did thinke to bewell employed, as hoping to have this man converted heere. For, ifhe go to the Court of Rome, and behold there the wickednes of thePriests lives, farewell all hope in me, of ever seeing him to become aChristian. But rather, were he already a Christian, without allquestion he would turne a Jew. And so going neerer to Abraham, hesaid. Alas my loving friend, why shouldst thou undertake such atedious travel, and so great a charge, as thy journey from hence toRome will cost thee? Consider, that to a rich man (as thou art)travaile by land or Sea is full of infinite dangers. Doest thou notthinke, that here are Religious men enow, who wil gladly bestowBaptisme upon thee? To mee therefore it plainely appeareth, thatsuch a voyage is to no purpose. If thou standest upon any doubt orscruple, concerning the faith whereto I wish thee; where canst thoudesire conference with greater Doctours, or men more learned in allrespects, then this famous Cittie doth affoord thee, to resolve theein any questionable case? Thou must thinke, that the Prelates are suchthere, as heere thou seest them to be, and yet they must needes bein much better condition at Rome, because they are neere to theprincipall Pastor. And therefore, if thou wilt credit my counsell,reserve this journey to some time more convenient, when the Jubilee ofgenerall Pardon happeneth, and then (perchance) I will beare theecompany, and go along with thee as in vowed Pilgrimage.

йҶ ۻ

Whereupon he answered Bruno, that it was no great matter ofmervaile, if he lived so merily as he did, having such a singularsupply, to avoide all necessities whatsoever: and very hardly could herefraine from immediate request, to be accepted into the company.But yet he thought fit to deferre it further, untill he had made Brunomore beholding to him, by friendly entertainments and othercourtesies, when he might (with better hope) be bold to move themotion.

The Noble men answered, that they were well satisfied, provided thathe tooke a wife.

WHEREBY APPEARETH, WHAT ILL SUCCESSE ATTENDETH ON THEM,

ͻ

What reason have I to spoyle thy life (thou traiterous Villaine)to rob and spoyle thy Master thus on the high way? Then turning to theCountrey Boores: How much deare friends (quoth he) am I beholding toyou for this unexpected kindnesse? You behold in what manner he leftme in my Lodging, having first playd away all my money at the Dice,and then deceiving me of my horse and garments also: but had not you(by great good lucke) thus holpe mee to stay him; a poore Gentlemanhad bin undone for ever, and I should never have found him againe.

ƷͼƬ

(ࣺӱӱ)

ר

ƼĶ

ش½ʼ˴սرɶ WHEREIN IS SIGNIFIED, HOW EASIE A THING IT IS, FOR WICKED MEN ϸ

־ڣй5Gû300| ̵2018|ջӦԼѷ׹߹٣ղֱѡ

ϰƽ߶ͳ Marke now, how quickly misery can receive comfort, upon so poore andsilly a question; for Guion began to elevate his dejected countenance,and looking on the Admirall, returned him this answer. Sir, heretoforeI have bene the man which you speake of; but now, both that name andman must die with me. What misfortune (said the Admirall) hath thusunkindly crost thee? Love (answered Guion) and the Kingsdispleasure. Then the Admirall would needs know the whole history atlarge, which briefly was related to him, and having heard how allhad happened; as he was turning his Horse to ride away thence, Guioncalled to him, saying, Good my Lord, entreat one favour for me, ifpossibly it may be. What is that? replyed the Admirall. You see Sir(quoth Guior) that I am very shortly to breathe my last; all the gracewhich I do most humbly entreat, is, that as I am here with this chasteVirgin, (whom I honour and love beyond my life) and miserably boundbacke to backe: our faces may be turned each to other, to the end,that when the fire shall finish my life, by looking on her, my soulemay take her flight in full felicity. The Admirall smiling, said; Iwill do for thee what I can, and (perhaps) thou mayest so long lookeon her, as thou wilt be weary, and desire to looke off her. ϸ

ϣ֣¶𣺰Ҫϼʩ| ̵2018|ý:Ӣ23ִԽϺ
ע΢

΢

΢

ֻ

쵼԰