0 万博官网manbetx注册-APP安装下载

万博官网manbetx注册 注册最新版下载

万博官网manbetx注册 注册

万博官网manbetx注册注册

类型【址:a g 9 559⒐ v i p】1:樊建川 大小:mPE3reEz75280KB 下载:HaIhW79L85544次
版本:v57705 系统:Android3.8.x以上 好评:4UbS17Wc51254条
日期:2020-08-09 00:01:54
安卓
高峻辉

1.【址:a g 9 559⒐ v i p】1  THE THIRD DAY THE FIFTH NOVELL
2.  While Thorello remayned in this his Faulconers condition, itfortuned uppon a day, that Saladine, conversing with him about hisHawkes: Thorello chanced to smile, and used such a kinde of gesture ormotion with his Lippes, which Saladine (when he was in his house atPavia) had heedfully observed, and by this note, instantly heremembred Signior Thorello, and began to eye him very respectively,perswading himselfe that he was the same man. And therefore fallingfrom their former kinde of discoursing: Tell me: Christian (quothSaladine) what Country-man art thou of the West? Sir, answeredSigniour Thorello, I am by Country a Lombard, borne in a Cittycalled Pavia, a poore man, and of as poore condition.
3.  THE FOURTH DAY, THE FOURTH NOVELL
4.  THE NINTH DAY, THE NINTH NOVELL
5.  THE FIRST DAY, THE SEVENTH NOVELL
6.  Ischia is an Iland very neere to Naples, wherein (not long since)lived a faire and lovely Gentlewoman, named Restituta, Daughter to aGentleman of the same Isle, whose name was Marino Bolgaro. A properyouth called Guion, dwelling also in a neere neighbouring Isle, calledProcida, did love her as dearly as his owne life, and she was asintimately affected towards him. Now because the sight of her washis onely comfort, as occasion gave him leave, he resorted to Ischiavery often in the day time, and as often also in the night season,when any Barke passed from Procida to Ischia; if to see nothingelse, yet to behold the walles that enclosed his Mistresse thus.

计划指导

1.  Eares, how are you depriv'd of sweete attention?
2.  Which if you do, I shall freely then confesse, that onely by yourmeanes, my Sonnes life is saved, and we both shall for ever remaineengaged to you.
3.  Then Rustico said: "Bless thee, my dear daughter; let us go atonce and put him in his place, that I may be at peace."
4.  Now (quoth the Monke) thou canst confesse thine owne wilfull follie,but this should have beene thought on before, and whilest thou wastliving in the World. But if the Fates vouchsafe to favour thee somuch, as hereafter to send thee to the World once more; remember thypunishment here in Purgatory, and sinne no more in that foule sinne ofjealousie. I pray you Sir tell me, replyed Ferando, after men aredead, and put into Purgatory, is there any hope of their ever visitingthe World any more? Yes, saide the Monke, if the fury of the Fatesbe once appeased. O that I knew (quoth Ferando) by what meanes theywould be appeased, and let me visite the World on againe: I would bethe best Husband that ever lived, and never more be jealous, neverwrong so good a Wife, nor ever use one unkind word against her. In themeane while, and till their anger may be qualified; when next myWife doth send me food, I pray you worke so much, that some Candlesmay be sent me also, because I live here in uncomfortabledarkenesse; and what should I doe with food, if I have no light.Shee sends Lights enow, answered the Monke, but they are burnt outon the Altar in Masse-time, and thou canst have none other here, butsuch as I must bring my selfe; neither are they allowed, but onely forthe time of thy feeding and correcting.
5.  Last of all consider also, how difficult a thing it is for awoman, so sodainly to raise the summe of a thousand golden Florines,when one friend promiseth, and performeth not; another protesteth, yethath no such meaning; a third sweareth, and yet proveth a falseLyar: so that by being thus ungently used, a breach is made betweenethe best frends living. From hence it proceeded, and no other defectelse, that I made not due returne of your five hundred Florins. Nosooner were you departed her but I had them readie, and as manymore, and could I have knowne whither to send them, they had bene withyou long time since, which because I could not (by any meanes)compasse, I kept them still for you in continuall readinesse, ashoping of your comming hither againe. So causing a purse to bebrought, wherein the same Florines were, which hee had deliveredher; she gave it into his hand, and prayed him to count them over,whether there were so many, or no.
6.  THE THIRD DAY, THE NINTH NOVELL

推荐功能

1.  Ricciardo durst not speake one word, but still expressed his affablebehaviour towards her, bestowing infinite embraces and kisses onher: which so much the more augmented her rage and anger, continuingon her chiding thus. If by these flatteries and idle follies, thouhopest to comfort or pacifie me, thou runnest quite by as from thyreckoning; for I shall never imagine my selfe halfe satisfied,untill in the presence of my parents, friends, and neighbours, Ihave revealed thy base behaviour. Tell mee, treacherous man, am notI as faire, as the wife of Ricciardo? Am I not as good a Gentlewomanborne, as shee is? What canst thou more respect in her, then is inmee? Villaine, monster, why doest thou not answere mee? I will send toRicciardo, who loveth mee beyond all other women in Naples, and yetcould never vaunt, that I gave him so much as a friendly looke: heshall know, what a dishonour thou hadst intended towards him; whichboth he and his friends will revenge soundly upon thee. Theexclamations of the Lady were so tedious and irksome, that Ricciardoperceiving, if shee continued longer in these complaints, worsewould ensue thereon, then could bee easily remedied: resolved tomake himselfe knowne unto her, to reclaime her out of this violentextasie, and holding her somewhat strictly, to prevent her escapingfrom him, he said. Madam, afflict your selfe no further, for, what Icould not obtaine by simply loving you, subtilty hath better taughtme, and I am your Ricciardo: which she hearing, and perfectlyknowing him by his voyce; shee would have leapt out of the Bath, butshee could not, and to avoyde her crying out, he layde his hand on hermouth, saying. Lady, what is done, cannot now be undone, albeit youcried out all your life time. If you exclaime, or make this knowneopenly by any meanes; two unavoydable dangers must needes ensuethereon. The one (which you ought more carefully to respect) is thewounding of your good renowne and honour, because, when you shall say,that by treacherie I drew you hither: I will boldly maintaine thecontrary, avouching, that having corrupted you with gold, and notgiving you so much as covetously you desired; you grew offended, andthereon made the outcry, and you are not to learne, that the worldis more easily induced to beleeve the worst, then any goodnesse, be itnever so manifest. Next unto this, mortall hatred must arisebetweene your husband and mee, and (perhaps) I shall as soone killhim, as he me; whereby you can hardly, live in any true contentmentafter. Wherefore, joy of my life, doe not in one moment, both shameyour selfe, and cause such perill betweene your husband and me: foryou are not the first, neither can be the last, that shall bedeceived. I have not beguiled you, to take any honour from you, butonely declared, the faithfull affection I beare you, and so shalldoe for ever, as being your bounden and most obedient servant; andas it is a long time agoe, since I dedicated my selfe and all mineto your service, so hence-forth must I remaine for ever. You arewise enough (I know) in all other things: then shew your selfe notto be silly or simple in this.
2.  About foure or five yeeres after the birth of her daughter, sheeconceived with child againe, and (at the limitted houre ofdeliverance) had a goodly Sonne, to the no little liking of theMarquesse. Afterward, a strange humour entred into his braine, namely,that by a long continued experience, and courses of intollerablequality; he would needes make proofe of his faire Wives patience.First he began to provoke her by injurious speeches, shewing fierceand frowning lookes to her, intimating; that his people grewdispleased with him, in regard of his Wives base birth andeducation, and so much the rather, because she was likely to bringchildren, who (by her blood) were no better then beggers, and murmuredat the daughter already borne. Which words when Grizelda heard,without any alteration of countenance, for the least distemperature inany appearing action she said.
3.  Matters proceeding on in this manner, and continuing longer thentheir love-sick passions easily could permit, yet neither being ableto finde out any other meanes of helpe; it fortuned that the King ofThunis promised his daughter in marriage to the King of Granada,whereat she grew exceedingly sorrowfull, perceiving, that not onelyshe should be sent further off, by a large distance of way from herfriend, but also be deprived utterly, of all hope ever to enjoy him.And if she could have devised any meanes, either by secret flight fromher Father, or any way else to further her intention, she would haveadventured it for the Princes sake. Gerbino in like maner bearing ofthis purposed marriage, lived in a hell of torments, consultingoftentimes with his soule, how he might be possessed of her bypower, when she should be sent by Sea to her husband, or privatestealing her away from her Fathers Court before: with these andinfinite other thoughts, was he incessantly afflicted, both day andnight.
4.  So putting on his Pilgrimes habit againe, kissing her once more, andcomforting her with future good successe, he departed from her,going to the prison where Aldobrandino lay, whom hee found morepensive, as being in hourely expectation of death, then any hope hehad to be freed from it. Being brought neerer to him by theprisoners favour, as seeming to be a man come onely to comfort him:sitting downe by him, thus he began. Aldobrandino, I am a friend ofthine, whom Heaven hath sent to doe thee good, in meere pittie andcompassion of thine innocency. And therefore, if thou wilt grant meone small request, which I am earnestly to crave at thy hands, thoushalt heare (without any failing) before to morrow at night, thesentence of thy free absolution, whereas now thou expectest nothingbut death; whereunto Aldobrandino thus answered. Friendly man,seeing thou art so carefull of my safety (although I know thee not,neither doe remember that ere I saw thee till now) thou must needsbe some especiall kinde friend of mine. And to tell thee the truth,I never committed the sinful deed for which I am condemned to death.True it is, I have other heinous and greevous sins, which(undoubtedly) have throwne. this heavy judgement on me, andtherefore I am the more willing to undergo it. Neverthelesse, let methus I us farre assure thee, that I would gladly not onely promisesomething which might be to the glory of God, if he were pleased inthis case to have mercy on me; but also would as willingly performeand accomplish it. Wherefore, demaund whatsoever thou pleasest, forunfained (if I escape with life) I will truly keepe promise with thee.
5.   There dwelt sometime in the City of Fano, two Lombards, the onebeing named Guidotto of Cremona, and the other Jacomino of Pavia,men of sufficient entrance into yeares, having followed the warres (asSouldiers) all their youthfull time. Guidotto feeling sicknesse toover-master him, and having no sonne, kinsman, or friend, in whom hemight repose more trust, then he did in Jacomino: having longconference with him about his worldly affaires, and setled his wholeestate in good order; he left a Daughter to his charge, about tenyeeres of age, with all such goods as he enjoyed, and then departedout of this life. It came to passe, that the City of Faenza, long timebeing molested with tedious warres, and subjected to very servilecondition; beganne now to recover her former strength, with freepermission (for all such as pleased) to returne and possesse theirformer dwellings. Whereupon, Jacomino (having sometime bene aninhabitant there) was desirous to live in Faenza againe, convayingthither all his goods, and taking with him also the young Girle, whichGuidotto had left him, whom hee loved, and respected as his ownechilde.
6.  THE SONG

应用

1.  Titus hearing this answer of Gisippus, looke how much the sweet hopeof that which he desired gave him pleasure, as much both duty andreason affronted him with shame; setting before his eyes this duconsideration, that the greater the liberality of Gisippus was,farre greater and unreasonable it appeared to him in disgrace, ifhee should unmannerly accept it. Wherefore, being unable to refrainfrom teares, and with such strength as his weaknesse would give leave,thus he replyed.
2.  So ceased Fiammetta her discourse, being generally commended, whenthe Queene, to prevent the losse of time, commanded Aemillia to follownext, who thus began. It liketh me best (gracious Ladies) to returnehome againe to our owne City, which it pleased the for.
3.  Aniolliero hearing him speake in such confused manner, andperceiving also, that they which stood gazing by, beleeved (as bytheir lookes appeared) that Fortarigo had not played away hisMasters mony at the Dice, but rather that he had some stocke ofFortarigoes in his custody; angerly answered; Thou sawcy companion,what have I to doe with thy Doublet? I would thou wert hangd, not onlyfor playing away my money, but also by delaying thus my journey, andyet boldly thou standest out-facing mee, as if I were no better thenthy fellow. Fortarigo held on still his former behaviour, withoutusing any respect or reverence to Aniolliero, as if all theaccusations did not concerne him, but saying, Why should wee nottake the advantage of three shillings profit? Thinkest thou, that I amnot able to doe as much for thee? why, lay out so much money for mysake, and make no more haste then needs we must, because we haveday-light enough to bring us (before night) to Torreniero. Come,draw thy purse, and pay the money, for upon mine honest word, I mayenquire throughout all Sienna, and yet not find such another Doubletas this of mine is. To say then, that I should leave it, where itnow lyeth pawned, and for eight and thirty shillings, when it isrichly more worth then fifty, I am sure to suffer a doubleendammagement thereby.
4、  THE FOURTH DAY, THE TENTH NOVELL
5、  In the City of Rome, which (in times past) was called the Lady andMistresse of the world, though now scarsely so good as the waiting,maid: there dwelt sometime yong Gentleman, named Pedro Boccamazzo,descended from one of the most honorable families in Rome, who wasmuch enamoured of a beautifull Gentlewoman, called Angelina,Daughter to one named Gigliuozzo Saullo, whose fortunes were none ofthe fairest, yet he greatly esteemed among the Romanes. Theentercourse of love betweene these twaine, had so equally enstructedtheir hearts and soule, that it could hardly be judged which of themwas the more fervent in affection. But he, not being inured to suchoppressing passions, and therefore the lesse able to support them,except he were sure to compasse his desire, plainly made the motion,that he might enjoy her in honourable mariage. Which his parents andfriends hearing, they went to conferre with him, blaming him withover-much basenesse, so farre to disgrace himselfe and his stocke.Beside, they advised the Father to the Maid, neither to credit whatPedro saide in this case, or to live in hope of any such match,because they all did wholly despise it.

旧版特色

!

网友评论(TJkZwLwK60491))

  • 张宇明 08-08

      Catharina standing musing awhile, at last returned him this answere.Signio Ricciardo, quoth she, you see what a restraint is set on myliberty, how short I am kept from conversing with any one, that I holdthis our enterparlance now almost miraculous. But if you coulddevise any convenient meanes, to admit us more familiar freedome,without any prejudice to mine honour, or the least distaste to myParents; do but enstruct it, and I will adventure it. Ricciardo havingconsidered on many wayes and meanes, thought one to be the fittestof all; and therefore thus replyed. Catharina (quoth he) the onelyplace for our more private talking together, I conceive to be theGallery over your Fathers Garden. If you can winne your Mother tolet you lodge there, I will make meanes to climbe over the wall, andat the goodly gazing window, we may discourse so long as we please.Now trust me deare Love (answered Catharina) no place can be moreconvenient for our purpose, there shall we heare the sweete Birdssing, especially the Nightingale which I have heard singing thereall the night long; I will breake the matter to my Mother, and how Ispeede, you shall heare further from me. So, with divers partingkisses, they brake off conference, till their next meeting.

  • 陈琪 08-08

      And having resolved what was to bee done, they met togither the nextmorning, even as Calandrino was comming foorth of his house, andsundering themselves, to avoyd all suspition, yet beeing not farredistant each from other; Nello first met him, and saide unto him, GoodMorrow Calandrino: which he requited backe agayne with the samesalutation. But then Nello standing still, looked him stedfastly inthe face: whereat Calandrino mervailing, sayd. Nello.

  • 陆玉仁 08-08

       When Scalza heard what they all had to say, he smiling cried: "Youare none of you in the right. I will maintain the family of theBaronchi to be the most ancient and noble not only in Florence butalso in the whole world. All philosophers and such as can besupposed to know that family,. I'm confident, are of my opinion; andthat you may not mistake my meaning I must tell you I mean theBaronchi our neighbours, who dwell near Santa Maria Maggiore." Theyall presently fell a-laughing, and asked him whether he took themfor people of the other world that they should not know the Baronchias well as he. "Gentlemen," says Scalza, "I am so far from takingyou for people of the other world that I will lay any one of you agood supper enough for six on what I affirm, and be judged by whom youplease."

  • 安义士 08-08

      Could free a woman from impatience:

  • 付百年 08-07

    {  It is not unknowne to you, partly by intelligence from ourreverend predecessours, as also some understanding of your owne,that many time have resorted to our City of Florence, Potestates andOfficers, belonging to the Marquesate of Anconia; who commonly weremen of lowe spirit, and their lives so wretched and penurious, as theyrather deserved to be tearmed Misers, then men. And in regard ofthis their naturall covetousnesse and misery, the Judges would bringalso in their company, such Scribes or Notaries, as being paraleldewith their Masters: they all seemed like Swaines come from the Plough,or bred up in some Coblers quality, rather then Schollers, or Studentsof Law.

  • 杜小炎 08-06

      Constraint having now no other evasion, but that (of necessitie) allmust out: hee related to them the whole adventure, in the same sort asit had befalne him. They greatly pittying his misfortune, one ofthem said to the other: Questionlesse, this villanie was done in thehouse of Scarabone Buttafucco. And then turning to Andrea, proceededthus. In good faith poore man, albeit thou hast lost thy money, yetart thou much beholding to Fortune, for falling (though in a fouleplace) yet in a succesfull manner, and entring no more backe intothe house. For beleeve mee friend, if thou haddest not falne, butquietly gone to sleepe in the house, that sleepe had beene thy last inthis world, and with thy money, thou hadst lost thy life likewise. Butteares and lamentations are now helpelesse, because as easily mayestthou plucke the Starres from the Firmament, as get againe the leastdoyt of thy losse. And for that shag-haird Slave in the house, he willbe thy deathsman, if hee but understand that thou makest anyenquirie after thy money. When he had thus admonished him, he beganalso in this manner to comfort him. Honest fellow,- we cannot butpitty thy present condition: wherfore if thou wilt frendly associateus, in a businesse which we are instantly going to effect; thy lossehath not bene so great, but on our words we will warrant thee, thatthine immediate gaine shall farre exceede it. What will not a man(in desperate extremity) both well like and allow of, especiallywhen it carryeth apparance of present comfort. So fared it withAndrea, hee perswaded himselfe, worse then had already happened, couldnot befall him; and therefore he would gladly adventure with them.}

  • 杜培杰 08-06

      THE NINTH DAY, THE EIGHT NOVELL

  • 汪析柳 08-06

      MIGHTY PREVAILING, POWER OF LOVE POWER OF LOVE

  • 代艳 08-05

       RATHER THEN ANY REASONABLE COMPREHENSION, A MAN MAY ESCAPE OUT OF

  • 平沼赳夫 08-03

    {  Not long had they run on this race, but the Treasures lefte themby their Father, began greatly to diminish; and their Revennewessuffised not, to support such lavish expences as they had begun: butthey fell to engaging and pawning their inheritances, selling one today, and another to morrow, so that they saw themselves quickelycome to nothing, and then poverty opened their eyes, which prodigalityhad before clozed up. Heereupon, Lamberto (on a day) calling hisBrethren to him, shewed them what the honors of their Father hadbeene, to what height his wealth amounted, and now to what an ebbeof poverty it was falne, only thorow their inordinate expences.Wherefore hee counselled them, (as best he could) before furthermisery insulted over them, to make sale of the small remainder thatwas left, and then to betake themselves unto some other abiding, wherefairer Fortune might chance to shine uppon them.

  • 郑芷南 08-03

      A Knight requested Madam Oretta, to ride behinde him on horse-backe,and promised, to tell her an excellent Tale by the way. But the Ladyperceiving, that his discourse was idle, and much worse delivered:entreated him to let her walke on foote againe.

提交评论