0 中乐平台官方-APP安装下载

中乐平台官方 注册最新版下载

中乐平台官方 注册

中乐平台官方注册

类型【址:a g 9 559⒐ v i p】1:艾晓娃 大小:8uKdUdad34803KB 下载:vowf5wUr54089次
版本:v57705 系统:Android3.8.x以上 好评:i95LLxyt99436条
日期:2020-08-12 07:01:59
安卓
钟东泉

1.【址:a g 9 559⒐ v i p】1  "Thus spoke Eurylochus, and the men approved his words. Now thecattle, so fair and goodly, were feeding not far from the ship; themen, therefore drove in the best of them, and they all stood roundthem saying their prayers, and using young oak-shoots instead ofbarley-meal, for there was no barley left. When they had donepraying they killed the cows and dressed their carcasses; they cut outthe thigh bones, wrapped them round in two layers of fat, and set somepieces of raw meat on top of them. They had no wine with which to makedrink-offerings over the sacrifice while it was cooking, so theykept pouring on a little water from time to time while the inwardmeats were being grilled; then, when the thigh bones were burned andthey had tasted the inward meats, they cut the rest up small and putthe pieces upon the spits.
2.  The foot races came first. The course was set out for them fromthe starting post, and they raised a dust upon the plain as they allflew forward at the same moment. Clytoneus came in first by a longway; he left every one else behind him by the length of the furrowthat a couple of mules can plough in a fallow field. They thenturned to the painful art of wrestling, and here Euryalus proved to bethe best man. Amphialus excelled all the others in jumping, while atthrowing the disc there was no one who could approach Elatreus.Alcinous's son Laodamas was the best boxer, and he it was whopresently said, when they had all been diverted with the games, "Letus ask the stranger whether he excels in any of these sports; he seemsvery powerfully built; his thighs, claves, hands, and neck are ofprodigious strength, nor is he at all old, but he has suffered muchlately, and there is nothing like the sea for making havoc with a man,no matter how strong he is."
3.  "Telemachus," said she, addressing her son, "I fear you are nolonger so discreet and well conducted as you used to be. When you wereyounger you had a greater sense of propriety; now, however, that youare grown up, though a stranger to look at you would take you forthe son of a well-to-do father as far as size and good looks go,your conduct is by no means what it should be. What is all thisdisturbance that has been going on, and how came you to allow astranger to be so disgracefully ill-treated? What would havehappened if he had suffered serious injury while a suppliant in ourhouse? Surely this would have been very discreditable to you."
4.  "'Come here,' they sang, 'renowned Ulysses, honour to the Achaeanname, and listen to our two voices. No one ever sailed past us withoutstaying to hear the enchanting sweetness of our song- and he wholistens will go on his way not only charmed, but wiser, for we knowall the ills that the gods laid upon the Argives and Trojans beforeTroy, and can tell you everything that is going to happen over thewhole world.'
5.  "After her I saw Iphimedeia wife of Aloeus who boasted the embraceof Neptune. She bore two sons Otus and Ephialtes, but both wereshort lived. They were the finest children that were ever born in thisworld, and the best looking, Orion only excepted; for at nine yearsold they were nine fathoms high, and measured nine cubits round thechest. They threatened to make war with the gods in Olympus, and triedto set Mount Ossa on the top of Mount Olympus, and Mount Pelion on thetop of Ossa, that they might scale heaven itself, and they wouldhave done it too if they had been grown up, but Apollo, son of Leto,killed both of them, before they had got so much as a sign of hairupon their cheeks or chin.
6.  "We waited the whole morning and made the best of it, watching theseals come up in hundreds to bask upon the sea shore, till at noon theold man of the sea came up too, and when he had found his fat seals hewent over them and counted them. We were among the first he counted,and he never suspected any guile, but laid himself down to sleep assoon as he had done counting. Then we rushed upon him with a shout andseized him; on which he began at once with his old tricks, and changedhimself first into a lion with a great mane; then all of a sudden hebecame a dragon, a leopard, a wild boar; the next moment he wasrunning water, and then again directly he was a tree, but we stuckto him and never lost hold, till at last the cunning old creaturebecame distressed, and said, Which of the gods was it, Son ofAtreus, that hatched this plot with you for snaring me and seizingme against my will? What do you want?'

计划指导

1.  Thus did they converse. Eurymachus then came up and said, "QueenPenelope, daughter of Icarius, if all the Achaeans in Iasian Argoscould see you at this moment, you would have still more suitors inyour house by tomorrow morning, for you are the most admirable womanin the whole world both as regards personal beauty and strength ofunderstanding."
2.  "I then gave him some more; three times did I fill the bowl for him,and three times did he drain it without thought or heed; then, whenI saw that the wine had got into his head, I said to him asplausibly as I could: 'Cyclops, you ask my name and I will tell ityou; give me, therefore, the present you promised me; my name isNoman; this is what my father and mother and my friends have alwayscalled me.'
3.  "My father is dead and gone," answered Telemachus, "and even if somerumour reaches me I put no more faith in it now. My mother does indeedsometimes send for a soothsayer and question him, but I give hisprophecyings no heed. As for the stranger, he was Mentes, son ofAnchialus, chief of the Taphians, an old friend of my father's." Butin his heart he knew that it had been the goddess.
4.  "Offer a prayer, sir," said he, "to King Neptune, for it is hisfeast that you are joining; when you have duly prayed and made yourdrink-offering, pass the cup to your friend that he may do so also.I doubt not that he too lifts his hands in prayer, for man cannot livewithout God in the world. Still he is younger than you are, and ismuch of an age with myself, so I he handed I will give you theprecedence."
5.  "It shall not be so, Eurymachus," said Antinous, "and you know ityourself. To-day is the feast of Apollo throughout all the land; whocan string a bow on such a day as this? Put it on one side- as for theaxes they can stay where they are, for no one is likely to come to thehouse and take them away: let the cupbearer go round with his cups,that we may make our drink-offerings and drop this matter of thebow; we will tell Melanthius to bring us in some goats to-morrow-the best he has; we can then offer thigh bones to Apollo the mightyarcher, and again make trial of the bow, so as to bring the contest toan end."
6.  Pisistratus thought how he should do as he was asked, and in the endhe deemed it best to turn his horses towards the ship, and putMenelaus's beautiful presents of gold and raiment in the stern ofthe vessel. Then he said, "Go on board at once and tell your men to doso also before I can reach home to tell my father. I know howobstinate he is, and am sure he will not let you go; he will come downhere to fetch you, and he will not go back without you. But he will bevery angry."

推荐功能

1.  Outside the gate of the outer court there is a large garden of aboutfour acres with a wall all round it. It is full of beautiful trees-pears, pomegranates, and the most delicious apples. There are lusciousfigs also, and olives in full growth. The fruits never rot nor failall the year round, neither winter nor summer, for the air is sosoft that a new crop ripens before the old has dropped. Pear growson pear, apple on apple, and fig on fig, and so also with thegrapes, for there is an excellent vineyard: on the level ground of apart of this, the grapes are being made into raisins; in anotherpart they are being gathered; some are being trodden in the wine tubs,others further on have shed their blossom and are beginning to showfruit, others again are just changing colour. In the furthest partof the ground there are beautifully arranged beds of flowers thatare in bloom all the year round. Two streams go through it, the oneturned in ducts throughout the whole garden, while the other iscarried under the ground of the outer court to the house itself, andthe town's people draw water from it. Such, then, were thesplendours with which the gods had endowed the house of king Alcinous.
2.  "Telemachus, I shall go upstairs and lie down on that sad couch,which I have not ceased to water with my tears, from the day Ulyssesset out for Troy with the sons of Atreus. You failed, however, to makeit clear to me before the suitors came back to the house, whether orno you had been able to hear anything about the return of yourfather."
3.  On this Asphalion, one of the servants, poured water over theirhands and they laid their hands on the good things that were beforethem.
4.  "Meanwhile Circe had been seeing that the men who had been leftbehind were washed and anointed with olive oil; she had also giventhem woollen cloaks and shirts, and when we came we found them allcomfortably at dinner in her house. As soon as the men saw eachother face to face and knew one another, they wept for joy and criedaloud till the whole palace rang again. Thereon Circe came up to meand said, 'Ulysses, noble son of Laertes, tell your men to leave offcrying; I know how much you have all of you suffered at sea, and howill you have fared among cruel savages on the mainland, but that isover now, so stay here, and eat and drink till you are once more asstrong and hearty as you were when you left Ithaca; for at present youare weakened both in body and mind; you keep all the time thinkingof the hardships- you have suffered during your travels, so that youhave no more cheerfulness left in you.'
5.   Thus he spoke, and Mercury, guide and guardian, slayer of Argus, didas he was told. Forthwith he bound on his glittering golden sandalswith which he could fly like the wind over land and sea. He took thewand with which he seals men's eyes in sleep or wakes them just ashe pleases, and flew holding it in his hand over Pieria; then heswooped down through the firmament till he reached the level of thesea, whose waves he skimmed like a cormorant that flies fishingevery hole and corner of the ocean, and drenching its thick plumage inthe spray. He flew and flew over many a weary wave, but when at lasthe got to the island which was his journey's end, he left the seaand went on by land till he came to the cave where the nymph Calypsolived.
6.  "Do not," replied Vulcan, "ask me to do this; a bad man's bond isbad security; what remedy could I enforce against you if Mars shouldgo away and leave his debts behind him along with his chains?"

应用

1.  This was his story, but Ulysses went on eating and drinkingravenously without a word, brooding his revenge. When he had eatenenough and was satisfied, the swineherd took the bowl from which heusually drank, filled it with wine, and gave it to Ulysses, who waspleased, and said as he took it in his hands, "My friend, who was thismaster of yours that bought you and paid for you, so rich and sopowerful as you tell me? You say he perished in the cause of KingAgamemnon; tell me who he was, in case I may have met with such aperson. Jove and the other gods know, but I may be able to give younews of him, for I have travelled much."
2.  "Fear not, nurse," answered Telemachus, "my scheme is not withoutheaven's sanction; but swear that you will say nothing about allthis to my mother, till I have been away some ten or twelve days,unless she hears of my having gone, and asks you; for I do not wanther to spoil her beauty by crying."
3.  Thus did he urge the swineherd; Eumaeus, therefore, took hissandals, bound them to his feet, and started for the town. Minervawatched him well off the station, and then came up to it in the formof a woman- fair, stately, and wise. She stood against the side of theentry, and revealed herself to Ulysses, but Telemachus could not seeher, and knew not that she was there, for the gods do not letthemselves be seen by everybody. Ulysses saw her, and so did the dogs,for they did not bark, but went scared and whining off to the otherside of the yards. She nodded her head and motioned to Ulysses withher eyebrows; whereon he left the hut and stood before her outside themain wall of the yards. Then she said to him:
4、  "Goddess," replied Ulysses, "do not be angry with me about this. Iam quite aware that my wife Penelope is nothing like so tall or sobeautiful as yourself. She is only a woman, whereas you are animmortal. Nevertheless, I want to get home, and can think of nothingelse. If some god wrecks me when I am on the sea, I will bear it andmake the best of it. I have had infinite trouble both by land andsea already, so let this go with the rest."
5、  Penelope heard what he was saying and scolded the maid, "Impudentbaggage, said she, "I see how abominably you are behaving, and youshall smart for it. You knew perfectly well, for I told you myself,that I was going to see the stranger and ask him about my husband, forwhose sake I am in such continual sorrow."

旧版特色

!

网友评论(JXhdVPww29468))

  • 奕扬 08-11

      But she would not give him full victory as yet, for she wished stillfurther to prove his own prowess and that of his brave son, so sheflew up to one of the rafters in the roof of the cloister and sat uponit in the form of a swallow.

  • 扬雄 08-11

      Then with both hands he took what Telemachus had sent him, andlaid it on the dirty old wallet at his feet. He went on eating itwhile the bard was singing, and had just finished his dinner as heleft off. The suitors applauded the bard, whereon Minerva went up toUlysses and prompted him to beg pieces of bread from each one of thesuitors, that he might see what kind of people they were, and tell thegood from the bad; but come what might she was not going to save asingle one of them. Ulysses, therefore, went on his round, goingfrom left to right, and stretched out his hands to beg as though hewere a real beggar. Some of them pitied him, and were curious abouthim, asking one another who he was and where he came from; whereon thegoatherd Melanthius said, "Suitors of my noble mistress, I can tellyou something about him, for I have seen him before. The swineherdbrought him here, but I know nothing about the man himself, norwhere he comes from."

  • 李渔 08-11

       "I also saw fair Epicaste mother of king OEdipodes whose awful lotit was to marry her own son without suspecting it. He married herafter having killed his father, but the gods proclaimed the wholestory to the world; whereon he remained king of Thebes, in great grieffor the spite the gods had borne him; but Epicaste went to the houseof the mighty jailor Hades, having hanged herself for grief, and theavenging spirits haunted him as for an outraged mother- to his ruingbitterly thereafter.

  • 白玉明 08-11

      On this he broke up the assembly, and every man went back to his ownabode, while the suitors returned to the house of Ulysses.

  • 黄文传 08-10

    {  With these words he led the way and the others followed after.When they had brought the things as he told them, Telemachus went onboard, Minerva going before him and taking her seat in the stern ofthe vessel, while Telemachus sat beside her. Then the men loosed thehawsers and took their places on the benches. Minerva sent them a fairwind from the West, that whistled over the deep blue waves whereonTelemachus told them to catch hold of the ropes and hoist sail, andthey did as he told them. They set the mast in its socket in the crossplank, raised it, and made it fast with the forestays; then theyhoisted their white sails aloft with ropes of twisted ox hide. Asthe sail bellied out with the wind, the ship flew through the deepblue water, and the foam hissed against her bows as she sped onward.Then they made all fast throughout the ship, filled the mixing-bowlsto the brim, and made drink offerings to the immortal gods that arefrom everlasting, but more particularly to the grey-eyed daughter ofJove.

  • 薄京官 08-09

      Then Telemachus went all alone by the sea side, washed his handsin the grey waves, and prayed to Minerva.}

  • 凯特 08-09

      "Happy son of Peleus," answered the ghost of Agamemnon, "forhaving died at Troy far from Argos, while the bravest of the Trojansand the Achaeans fell round you fighting for your body. There youlay in the whirling clouds of dust, all huge and hugely, heedlessnow of your chivalry. We fought the whole of the livelong day, norshould we ever have left off if Jove had not sent a hurricane tostay us. Then, when we had borne you to the ships out of the fray,we laid you on your bed and cleansed your fair skin with warm waterand with ointments. The Danaans tore their hair and wept bitterlyround about you. Your mother, when she heard, came with her immortalnymphs from out of the sea, and the sound of a great wailing wentforth over the waters so that the Achaeans quaked for fear. They wouldhave fled panic-stricken to their ships had not wise old Nestorwhose counsel was ever truest checked them saying, 'Hold, Argives, flynot sons of the Achaeans, this is his mother coming from the seawith her immortal nymphs to view the body of her son.'

  • 何慧霞 08-09

      "'When your crew have taken you past these Sirens, I cannot give youcoherent directions as to which of two courses you are to take; I willlay the two alternatives before you, and you must consider them foryourself. On the one hand there are some overhanging rocks againstwhich the deep blue waves of Amphitrite beat with terrific fury; theblessed gods call these rocks the Wanderers. Here not even a birdmay pass, no, not even the timid doves that bring ambrosia to FatherJove, but the sheer rock always carries off one of them, and FatherJove has to send another to make up their number; no ship that everyet came to these rocks has got away again, but the waves andwhirlwinds of fire are freighted with wreckage and with the bodiesof dead men. The only vessel that ever sailed and got through, was thefamous Argo on her way from the house of Aetes, and she too would havegone against these great rocks, only that Juno piloted her past themfor the love she bore to Jason.

  • 张续 08-08

       "Do not find fault child," said Euryclea, "when there is no one tofind fault with. The stranger sat and drank his wine as long as heliked: your mother did ask him if he would take any more bread andhe said he would not. When he wanted to go to bed she told theservants to make one for him, but he said he was re such wretchedoutcast that he would not sleep on a bed and under blankets; heinsisted on having an undressed bullock's hide and some sheepskins putfor him in the cloister and I threw a cloak over him myself."

  • 张小慧 08-06

    {  And the vision said, "I shall not tell you for certain whether he isalive or dead, and there is no use in idle conversation."

  • 杰克·卢 08-06

      "Thus did we converse, and anon Proserpine sent up the ghosts of thewives and daughters of all the most famous men. They gathered incrowds about the blood, and I considered how I might question themseverally. In the end I deemed that it would be best to draw thekeen blade that hung by my sturdy thigh, and keep them from alldrinking the blood at once. So they came up one after the other, andeach one as I questioned her told me her race and lineage.

提交评论