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类型【址:a g 9 559⒐ v i p】1:江传谱 大小:jF6ixKHy59877KB 下载:wHa0l1rd93283次
版本:v57705 系统:Android3.8.x以上 好评:sChE9hb486907条
日期:2020-08-11 23:59:23
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王大虎

1.【址:a g 9 559⒐ v i p】1  The swineherd now took up the bow and was for taking it toUlysses, but the suitors clamoured at him from all parts of thecloisters, and one of them said, "You idiot, where are you takingthe bow to? Are you out of your wits? If Apollo and the other godswill grant our prayer, your own boarhounds shall get you into somequiet little place, and worry you to death."
2.  "Aeolus entertained me for a whole month asking me questions all thetime about Troy, the Argive fleet, and the return of the Achaeans. Itold him exactly how everything had happened, and when I said I mustgo, and asked him to further me on my way, he made no sort ofdifficulty, but set about doing so at once. Moreover, he flayed me aprime ox-hide to hold the ways of the roaring winds, which he shutup in the hide as in a sack- for Jove had made him captain over thewinds, and he could stir or still each one of them according to hisown pleasure. He put the sack in the ship and bound the mouth sotightly with a silver thread that not even a breath of a side-windcould blow from any quarter. The West wind which was fair for us didhe alone let blow as it chose; but it all came to nothing, for we werelost through our own folly.
3.  "Next to her I saw Antiope, daughter to Asopus, who could boast ofhaving slept in the arms of even Jove himself, and who bore him twosons Amphion and Zethus. These founded Thebes with its seven gates,and built a wall all round it; for strong though they were theycould not hold Thebes till they had walled it.
4.  Thus spoke the stockman, and Ulysses struck the son of Damastor witha spear in close fight, while Telemachus hit Leocritus son of Evenorin the belly, and the dart went clean through him, so that he fellforward full on his face upon the ground. Then Minerva from her seaton the rafter held up her deadly aegis, and the hearts of thesuitors quailed. They fled to the other end of the court like a herdof cattle maddened by the gadfly in early summer when the days areat their longest. As eagle-beaked, crook-taloned vultures from themountains swoop down on the smaller birds that cower in flocks uponthe ground, and kill them, for they cannot either fight or fly, andlookers on enjoy the sport- even so did Ulysses and his men fallupon the suitors and smite them on every side. They made a horriblegroaning as their brains were being battered in, and the groundseethed with their blood.
5.  Thus conversing the two made their way towards the house. Whenthey got there they found Telemachus with the stockman and theswineherd cutting up meat and mixing wine with water. Then the oldSicel woman took Laertes inside and washed him and anointed him withoil. She put him on a good cloak, and Minerva came up to him andgave him a more imposing presence, making him taller and stouterthan before. When he came back his son was surprised to see himlooking so like an immortal, and said to him, "My dear father, someone of the gods has been making you much taller and better-looking."
6.  "And I saw Tityus son of Gaia stretched upon the plain andcovering some nine acres of ground. Two vultures on either side of himwere digging their beaks into his liver, and he kept on trying to beatthem off with his hands, but could not; for he had violated Jove'smistress Leto as she was going through Panopeus on her way to Pytho.

计划指导

1.  Telemachus saw Eumaeus long before any one else did, and beckonedhim to come and sit beside him; so he looked about and saw a seatlying near where the carver sat serving out their portions to thesuitors; he picked it up, brought it to Telemachus's table, and satdown opposite him. Then the servant brought him his portion, andgave him bread from the bread-basket.
2.  ULYSSES now left the haven, and took the rough track up throughthe wooded country and over the crest of the mountain till hereached the place where Minerva had said that he would find theswineherd, who was the most thrifty servant he had. He found himsitting in front of his hut, which was by the yards that he hadbuilt on a site which could be seen from far. He had made themspacious and fair to see, with a free ran for the pigs all round them;he had built them during his master's absence, of stones which hehad gathered out of the ground, without saying anything to Penelope orLaertes, and he had fenced them on top with thorn bushes. Outsidethe yard he had run a strong fence of oaken posts, split, and setpretty close together, while inside lie had built twelve sties nearone another for the sows to lie in. There were fifty pigs wallowing ineach sty, all of them breeding sows; but the boars slept outside andwere much fewer in number, for the suitors kept on eating them, anddie swineherd had to send them the best he had continually. There werethree hundred and sixty boar pigs, and the herdsman's four hounds,which were as fierce as wolves, slept always with them. Theswineherd was at that moment cutting out a pair of sandals from a goodstout ox hide. Three of his men were out herding the pigs in one placeor another, and he had sent the fourth to town with a boar that he hadbeen forced to send the suitors that they might sacrifice it andhave their fill of meat.
3.  "Therefore, Sir, do you on your part affect no more concealmentnor reserve in the matter about which I shall ask you; it will be morepolite in you to give me a plain answer; tell me the name by whichyour father and mother over yonder used to call you, and by whichyou were known among your neighbours and fellow-citizens. There isno one, neither rich nor poor, who is absolutely without any namewhatever, for people's fathers and mothers give them names as soonas they are born. Tell me also your country, nation, and city, thatour ships may shape their purpose accordingly and take you there.For the Phaeacians have no pilots; their vessels have no rudders asthose of other nations have, but the ships themselves understandwhat it is that we are thinking about and want; they know all thecities and countries in the whole world, and can traverse the sea justas well even when it is covered with mist and cloud, so that thereis no danger of being wrecked or coming to any harm. Still I doremember hearing my father say that Neptune was angry with us forbeing too easy-going in the matter of giving people escorts. He saidthat one of these days he should wreck a ship of ours as it wasreturning from having escorted some one, and bury our city under ahigh mountain. This is what my used to say, but whether the god willcarry out his threat or no is a matter which he will decide forhimself.
4.  With this he left them to come on at their leisure, while he wentquickly forward and soon reached the house of his master. When hegot there he went in and took his seat among the suitors oppositeEurymachus, who liked him better than any of the others. Theservants brought him a portion of meat, and an upper woman servant setbread before him that he might eat. Presently Ulysses and theswineherd came up to the house and stood by it, amid a sound of music,for Phemius was just beginning to sing to the suitors. Then Ulyssestook hold of the swineherd's hand, and said:
5.  The foot races came first. The course was set out for them fromthe starting post, and they raised a dust upon the plain as they allflew forward at the same moment. Clytoneus came in first by a longway; he left every one else behind him by the length of the furrowthat a couple of mules can plough in a fallow field. They thenturned to the painful art of wrestling, and here Euryalus proved to bethe best man. Amphialus excelled all the others in jumping, while atthrowing the disc there was no one who could approach Elatreus.Alcinous's son Laodamas was the best boxer, and he it was whopresently said, when they had all been diverted with the games, "Letus ask the stranger whether he excels in any of these sports; he seemsvery powerfully built; his thighs, claves, hands, and neck are ofprodigious strength, nor is he at all old, but he has suffered muchlately, and there is nothing like the sea for making havoc with a man,no matter how strong he is."
6.  Their hearts sank as they heard him, but Eurymachus again spokesaying:

推荐功能

1.  This was what they said, but they did not know what was going tohappen. Then Antinous said, "Comrades, let there be no loud talking,lest some of it get carried inside. Let us be up and do that insilence, about which we are all of a mind."
2.  Telemachus approved of what his father had said, so he callednurse Euryclea and said, "Nurse, shut the women up in their room,while I take the armour that my father left behind him down into thestore room. No one looks after it now my father is gone, and it hasgot all smirched with soot during my own boyhood. I want to take itdown where the smoke cannot reach it."
3.  Thus spoke Minerva daughter of Jove, and Telemachus lost no timein doing as the goddess told him. He went moodily and found thesuitors flaying goats and singeing pigs in the outer court. Antinouscame up to him at once and laughed as he took his hand in his own,saying, "Telemachus, my fine fire-eater, bear no more ill bloodneither in word nor deed, but eat and drink with us as you used to do.The Achaeans will find you in everything- a ship and a picked crewto boot- so that you can set sail for Pylos at once and get news ofyour noble father."
4.  The company then laid their hands upon the good things that werebefore them, but as soon as they had had enough to eat and drink,the muse inspired Demodocus to sing the feats of heroes, and moreespecially a matter that was then in the mouths of all men, to wit,the quarrel between Ulysses and Achilles, and the fierce words thatthey heaped on one another as they gat together at a banquet. ButAgamemnon was glad when he heard his chieftains quarrelling with oneanother, for Apollo had foretold him this at Pytho when he crossed thestone floor to consult the oracle. Here was the beginning of theevil that by the will of Jove fell both Danaans and Trojans.
5.   "Then some malicious god conveyed Ulysses to the upland farm wherehis swineherd lives. Thither presently came also his son, returningfrom a voyage to Pylos, and the two came to the town when they hadhatched their plot for our destruction. Telemachus came first, andthen after him, accompanied by the swineherd, came Ulysses, clad inrags and leaning on a staff as though he were some miserable oldbeggar. He came so unexpectedly that none of us knew him, not even theolder ones among us, and we reviled him and threw things at him. Heendured both being struck and insulted without a word, though he wasin his own house; but when the will of Aegis-bearing Jove inspiredhim, he and Telemachus took the armour and hid it in an inner chamber,bolting the doors behind them. Then he cunningly made his wife offerhis bow and a quantity of iron to be contended for by us ill-fatedsuitors; and this was the beginning of our end, for not one of uscould string the bow- nor nearly do so. When it was about to reach thehands of Ulysses, we all of us shouted out that it should not be givenhim, no matter what he might say, but Telemachus insisted on hishaving it. When he had got it in his hands he strung it with easeand sent his arrow through the iron. Then he stood on the floor of thecloister and poured his arrows on the ground, glaring fiercely abouthim. First he killed Antinous, and then, aiming straight before him,he let fly his deadly darts and they fell thick on one another. It wasplain that some one of the gods was helping them, for they fell uponus with might and main throughout the cloisters, and there was ahideous sound of groaning as our brains were being battered in, andthe ground seethed with our blood. This, Agamemnon, is how we cameby our end, and our bodies are lying still un-cared for in the houseof Ulysses, for our friends at home do not yet know what has happened,so that they cannot lay us out and wash the black blood from ourwounds, making moan over us according to the offices due to thedeparted."
6.  "Have we any idea, Antinous, on what day Telemachus returns fromPylos? He has a ship of mine, and I want it, to cross over to Elis:I have twelve brood mares there with yearling mule foals by their sidenot yet broken in, and I want to bring one of them over here and breakhim."

应用

1.  "Father Jove," he cried, "and all you other blessed gods who livefor ever, come here and see the ridiculous and disgraceful sightthat I will show you. Jove's daughter Venus is always dishonouringme because I am lame. She is in love with Mars, who is handsome andclean built, whereas I am a cripple- but my parents are to blame forthat, not I; they ought never to have begotten me. Come and see thepair together asleep on my bed. It makes me furious to look at them.They are very fond of one another, but I do not think they will liethere longer than they can help, nor do I think that they will sleepmuch; there, however, they shall stay till her father has repaid methe sum I gave him for his baggage of a daughter, who is fair butnot honest."
2.  And Ulysses answered, "King Alcinous, if you were to bid me tostay here for a whole twelve months, and then speed me on my way,loaded with your noble gifts, I should obey you gladly and it wouldredound greatly to my advantage, for I should return fuller-handedto my own people, and should thus be more respected and beloved by allwho see me when I get back to Ithaca."
3.  Thus did they converse. Then Arete told her maids to set a bed inthe room that was in the gatehouse, and make it with good red rugs,and to spread coverlets on the top of them with woollen cloaks forUlysses to wear. The maids thereon went out with torches in theirhands, and when they had made the bed they came up to Ulysses andsaid, "Rise, sir stranger, and come with us for your bed is ready,"and glad indeed was he to go to his rest.
4、  "Then I saw Alcmena, the wife of Amphitryon, who also bore to Joveindomitable Hercules; and Megara who was daughter to great King Creon,and married the redoubtable son of Amphitryon.
5、  "I too, my son," said she, "have something for you as a keepsakefrom the hand of Helen; it is for your bride to wear upon herwedding day. Till then, get your dear mother to keep it for you;thus may you go back rejoicing to your own country and to your home."

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  • 杨溪亮 08-10

      Then Eumaeus said, "You have perceived aright, as indeed yougenerally do; but let us think what will be our best course. Willyou go inside first and join the suitors, leaving me here behindyou, or will you wait here and let me go in first? But do not waitlong, or some one may you loitering about outside, and throw somethingat you. Consider this matter I pray you."

  • 樊康 08-10

      "Hush, my dears, for I want to say something. I believe the gods wholive in heaven have sent this man to the Phaeacians. When I firstsaw him I thought him plain, but now his appearance is like that ofthe gods who dwell in heaven. I should like my future husband to bejust such another as he is, if he would only stay here and not want togo away. However, give him something to eat and drink."

  • 曹显发 08-10

       Then he went downstairs again, leaving Penelope in an agony ofgrief. There were plenty of seats in the house, but she. had noheart for sitting on any one of them; she could only fling herselfon the floor of her own room and cry; whereon all the maids in thehouse, both old and young, gathered round her and began to cry too,till at last in a transport of sorrow she exclaimed,

  • 丹增 08-10

      "Ulysses," said he, "now that you have reached my house I doubtnot you will get home without further misadventure no matter howmuch you have suffered in the past. To you others, however, who comehere night after night to drink my choicest wine and listen to mybard, I would insist as follows. Our guest has already packed up theclothes, wrought gold, and other valuables which you have broughtfor his acceptance; let us now, therefore, present him further, eachone of us, with a large tripod and a cauldron. We will recoupourselves by the levy of a general rate; for private individualscannot be expected to bear the burden of such a handsome present."

  • 尚稷 08-09

    {  Then it vanished through the thong-hole of the door and wasdissipated into thin air; but Penelope rose from her sleep refreshedand comforted, so vivid had been her dream.

  • 顾而已 08-08

      The king was delighted at this, and exclaimed to the Phaecians"Aldermen and town councillors, our guest seems to be a person ofsingular judgement; let us give him such proof of our hospitality ashe may reasonably expect. There are twelve chief men among you, andcounting myself there are thirteen; contribute, each of you, a cleancloak, a shirt, and a talent of fine gold; let us give him all this ina lump down at once, so that when he gets his supper he may do so witha light heart. As for Euryalus he will have to make a formal apologyand a present too, for he has been rude."}

  • 斯里纳加 08-08

      "Madam," answered Ulysses, "it is such a long time ago that I canhardly say. Twenty years are come and gone since he left my home,and went elsewhither; but I will tell you as well as I canrecollect. Ulysses wore a mantle of purple wool, double lined, andit was fastened by a gold brooch with two catches for the pin. Onthe face of this there was a device that showed a dog holding aspotted fawn between his fore paws, and watching it as it laypanting upon the ground. Every one marvelled at the way in which thesethings had been done in gold, the dog looking at the fawn, andstrangling it, while the fawn was struggling convulsively to escape.As for the shirt that he wore next his skin, it was so soft that itfitted him like the skin of an onion, and glistened in the sunlight tothe admiration of all the women who beheld it. Furthermore I say,and lay my saying to your heart, that I do not know whether Ulysseswore these clothes when he left home, or whether one of his companionshad given them to him while he was on his voyage; or possibly some oneat whose house he was staying made him a present of them, for he was aman of many friends and had few equals among the Achaeans. I myselfgave him a sword of bronze and a beautiful purple mantle, doublelined, with a shirt that went down to his feet, and I sent him onboard his ship with every mark of honour. He had a servant with him, alittle older than himself, and I can tell you what he was like; hisshoulders were hunched, he was dark, and he had thick curly hair.His name was Eurybates, and Ulysses treated him with greaterfamiliarity than he did any of the others, as being the mostlike-minded with himself."

  • 尹超文 08-08

      "Hear me, O King, whoever you may be, and save me from the angerof the sea-god Neptune, for I approach you prayerfully. Any one whohas lost his way has at all times a claim even upon the gods,wherefore in my distress I draw near to your stream, and cling tothe knees of your riverhood. Have mercy upon me, O king, for I declaremyself your suppliant."

  • 沈祖 08-07

       Thus did he speak, and his words pleased them well, so they roseforthwith and went to the house of Ulysses where they took theiraccustomed seats.

  • 刘风 08-05

    {  "This hound," answered Eumaeus, "belonged to him who has died in afar country. If he were what he was when Ulysses left for Troy, hewould soon show you what he could do. There was not a wild beast inthe forest that could get away from him when he was once on itstracks. But now he has fallen on evil times, for his master is deadand gone, and the women take no care of him. Servants never do theirwork when their master's hand is no longer over them, for Jove takeshalf the goodness out of a man when he makes a slave of him."

  • 蒋生元 08-05

      "Those who have seen us both," answered Ulysses, "have always saidwe were wonderfully like each other, and now you have noticed it too.

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