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2020-08-04 02:24:35  Դձ
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When the religious man perceived, that nothing more was to beeconfessed by Master Chappelet; he gave him absolution, and his ownebenediction beside, reputing him to be a most holy man, as verilybeleeving all that hee had said. And who would not have done the like,hearing a man to speake in this manner, and being upon the verypoint of death? Afterward, he saide unto him, Master Chappelet, byGods grace you may be soone restored to health, but if it so come topasse, that God doe take your blessed and well disposed soule to hismercy, will it please you to have your body buried in our Convent?Whereto Master Chappelet answered; I thanke you Father for your goodmotion, and sorry should I be, if my friends did bury me any whereelse, because you have promised to pray to God for me; and beside, Ihave alwayes carried a religious devotion to your Order. Wherefore,I beseech you, so soone as you are come home to your Convent, prevaileso much by your good meanes, that the holy Eucharist, consecrated thismorning on your high Altar, may be brought unto me: for although Iconfesse my selfe utterly unworthy, yet I purpose (by your reverendpermission) to receive it, as also your holy and latest unction, tothis ende, that having lived a greevous sinner, I may yet (at thelast) die a Christian. These words were pleasing to the good olde man,and he caused every thing to be performed, according as MasterChappelet had requested.

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No sooner had hee opened the doore, but stich a smell of brimstonecame foorth (whereof wee felt not the least savour before) as madeus likewise to cough and sneeze, being no way able to refraine it.Shee seeing her Husband to bee much moved, excused the matter thus:that (but a little while before) shee had whited certaine linnenwith the smoake of brimstone, as it is a usuall thing to doe, and thenset the Pan into that spare place, because it should not bee offensiveto us. By this time, Herculano had espied him that sneezed, whobeing almost stifled with the smell, and closenesse of the small roomewherein hee lay, had not any power to helpe himselfe, but stillcontinued coughing and sneezing, even as if his heart would have splitin twaine. Foorth hee pluckt him by the heeles, and perceiving howmatter had past, hee saide to her. I thanke you Wife now I see thereason, why you kept us so long from comming into this roome: letmee die, if I beare this wrong at your hands. When his Wife heardthese words, and saw the discovery of her shame; without returningeither excuse or answere, foorth of doores shee ranne, but whither,wee know not. Herculano drew his Dagger, and would have slaine himthat still lay sneezing: but I disswaded him from it, as well inrespect of his, as also mine owne danger, when the Law shouldcensure on the deede. And after the young man was indifferentlyrecovered; by the perswasion of some Neighbours comming in: hee wasclosely conveyed out of the House, and all the noyse quietly pacified.Onely (by this meanes, and the flight of Herculanoes Wife) wee weredisappointed of our Supper, and now you know the reason of my so soonereturning.

Messer Currado, in kinde love to the strangers that hee hadinvited to supper, gave over any further contestation; onely hesaid. Seeing thou assurest me, to let me see thy affirmation fortruth, by other of the same Fowles living (a thing which as yet Inever saw, or heard of) I am content to make proofe thereof tomorrow morning, till then I shall rest satisfied: but, upon my word,if I finde it otherwise, expect such a sound payment, as thy knaveryjustly deserveth, to make thee remember it all thy life time. Thecontention ceassing for the night season, Messer Currado, who thoughhe had slept well, remained still discontented in his minde: arosein the morning by breake of day, and puffing and blowing angerly,called for his horses, commanding Chichibio to mount on one of them;so riding on towards the River, where (earely every morning) he hadseene plenty of Cranes, he sayde to his man; We shall see anonSirra, whether thou or I lyed yesternight.

WHEREBY PLAINLY APPEARETH, THAT THEY WHICH TAKE DELIGHT IN

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CHECKING THE ARROGANT PRIDE OF VAINE-HEADED WOMEN

Now the Feast of Christmasse drawing neere, the Gentlewoman saidto her Husband; that, if it stood with his liking: she would do suchduty as fitted with so solemne a time, by going earely in a morningunto Church, there to be confessed, and receive her Saviour, asother Christians did. How now? replied the jealous Asse, what sinneshave you committed, that should neede confession? How Husband? quothshe, what do you thinke me to be a Saint? Who knoweth not, I pray you,that I am as subject to sinne, as any other Woman living in the world?But my sins are not to be revealed to you, because you are noPriest. These words enflamed his jealousie more violently then before,and needes must he know what sinnes she had committed, and havingresolved what to do in this case, made her answer: That hee wascontented with her motion, alwaies provided, that she went to no otherChurch, then unto their owne Chappel, betimes in a morning; andtheir own Chaplaine to confesse her, or some other Priest by himappointed, but not any other: and then she to returne home presentlyagaine. She being a woman of acute apprehension, presently collectedhis whole intention: but seeming to take no knowledge thereof,replyed, that she would not swerve from his direction.

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But, because I would not speake particularly of all our fraile andhumane affections, I dare assure ye, that there is not any one ofthese desires to be elected among us mortals, with entire forsightor providence, warrantable against their ominous yssue. Wherefore,if we would walke directly, wee should dispose our willes andaffections, to be guided onely by him, who best knoweth what isneedfull for us, and will bestow them at his good pleasure. Nor let melay this blamefull imputation uppon men onely, for offending in manythrough over lavish desires: because you your selves (gracious Ladies)sinne highly in one, as namely, in coveting to be beautifull. Sothat it is not sufficient for you, to enjoy those beauties bestowne onyou by Nature; but you practice to increase them by the rarities ofArt. Wherefore, let it not offend you, that I tell you the hardfortune of a faire Sarazine, to whom it hapned by straunge adventures,that within the compasse of foure yeares, nine severall times to bemarried. and onely for her beauty.

It came to passe, that Spinelloccio, by often resorting to the houseof Zeppa, as well in his absence, as when he abode at home; beganne toglance amorous looks on Zeppaes wife, and pursued his unneighbourlypurpose in such sort: that hee being the stronger perswader, and she(belike) too credulous in beleeving, or else overfeeble inresisting; from private imparlance, they fell to action; and continuedtheir close fight a long while together, unseene and withoutsuspition, no doubt to their equall joy and contentment.But, whether as a just punishment, for breaking so loving a league offriendship and neighbour-hood, or rather a fatall infliction, evermoreattending on the closest Cuckoldry, their felicity still continuing inthis kinde: it fortuned on a day, Zeppa abiding within doors, contraryto the knowledge of his wife, Spinelloccio came to enquire for him,and she answering (as she verily supposed) that he was gon abroad:uppe they went both together into the Hall, and no bodie being thereto hinder what they intended, they fell to their wonted recreationwithout any feare, kissing and embracing as Lovers use to do.

Although I found my liberty was lost.

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After dinner, they sung divers excellent Canzonnets, and then somewent to sleepe, others played at the Chesse, and some at the Tables:But Dioneus and Madam Lauretta, they sung the love-conflict betweeneTroylus and Cressida. Now was the houre come, of repairing to theirformer Consistory or meeting place, the Queene having theretogenerally summoned them, and seating themselves (as they were wontto doe) about the faire fountaine. As the Queene was commanding tobegin the first Novell, an accident suddenly happened, which never hadbefalne before: to wit, they heard a great noyse and tumult, among thehoushold servants in the Kitchin. Whereupon, the Queene caused theMaster of the Houshold to be called, demaunding of him, what noyseit was, and what might be the occasion thereof? He made answere,that Lacisca and Tindaro were at some words of discontentment, butwhat was the occasion thereof, he knew not. Whereupon, the Queenecommanded that they should be sent for, (their anger and violentspeeches still continuing) and being come into her presence, shedemaunded the reason of their discord; and Tindaro offering to makeanswere, Lacisca (being somewhat more ancient then he, and of afiercer fiery spirit, even as if her heart would have leapt out of hermouth) turned her selfe to him, and with a scornefull frowningcountenance, said. See how this bold, unmannerly and beastly fellow,dare presume to speake in this place before me: Stand by (saucyimpudence) and give your better leave to answere; then turning tothe Queene, thus shee proceeded.

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Ʊ9o1appг:˲Ŵս,СҲҪȥ Alas courteous Gentleman, in an unblessed houre came my Ladyesbrother hither yesternight, inflicting too much trouble upon us, and agrievous time of affliction to you. But I am not ignorant, that youbeing vertuous, and a judicious Scholler, have an invincible spirit ofpacience, and sufficient understanding withall; that what this nightcould not affoord, another may make a sound amends for. This I can anddare sufficiently assure you, that nothing could be more displeasingto my Lady, neither can she well be quieted in her mind: untill shehave made a double and treble requitall, for such a strange unexpectedinconvenience, whereof she had not the very least suspition. ϸ

ϼ永߱ߺͽ Эع| ̵2018|Ѻ2019ϲͯѡ ͶƱ

Ʊ9o1app⺭ɲʹ˱з Deere Love, and my most worthily respected friend, I perceiveplainly and infallibly, that I am drawing neere unto my end, whichmuch discontenteth me; because my hope was to have lived longer inthis world, for the enjoying of your kinde and most esteemedcompany. Yet one thing maketh my death very pleasing and welcome tome; namely, that lying thus in my bed of latest comfort in thislife, I shall expire and finish my course, in the armes of those twopersons, whome I most affected in all this world, as you myever-deerest friend, and you faire Lady, whom (since the very firstsight of you) I loved and honoured in my soule. Irkesome and veriegreevous it is to me, that (if I dye) I shall leave you here astranger, without the counsaile and helpe of any bodie: and yet muchmore offensive would it become, if I had not such a friend as youheere present, who (I am faithfully perswaded) will have the like careand respect of her (even for my sake) as of my selfe, if time hadallotted my longer tarrying here. And therefore (worthy friend) mostearnestly I desire you, that if I dye, all mine affaires and she mayremaine to your trustie care, as being (by my selfe) absolutelycommended to your providence, and so to dispose both of the one andother, as may best agree with the comfort of my soule. As for you(choice beauty) I humbly entreate, that after my death you would notforget me, to the end, I may make my vaunt in another world, that Iwas affected here by the fairest Lady that ever Nature framed. If ofthese two things you will give mee assurance, I shall depart fromyou with no meane comfort. ϸ

Ʊ9o1appܾǼ۽7СײǼ4,ϺһⱻԪ| ̵2018|ʲôϴʲô?ôô?˵ǿ