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2020-08-06 07:14:36  Դձ
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nbaͶעַ:a g 9 559 v i p<"I wish someone lived there," Sara said. "It is so close that if there was a little girl in the attic, we could talk to each other through the windows and climb over to see each other, if we were not afraid of falling.""There's one thing about Sara Crewe," Jessie had enraged her "best friend" by saying honestly, "she's never `grand' about herself the least bit, and you know she might be, Lavvie. I believe I couldn't help being-- just a little--if I had so many fine things and was made such a fuss over. It's disgusting, the way Miss Minchin shows her off when parents come."

"I believe you hate her," said Jessie.

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"You ought to have told me," exclaimed Miss Minchin, much mortified, turning to Sara.

"She said I was a cry-baby," wept Lottie.

"Yes, 'm; I will, 'm," she said, trembling; "but oh, I just wanted to arst you: Miss Sara--she's been such a rich young lady, an' she's been waited on, 'and and foot; an' what will she do now, mum, without no maid? If--if, oh please, would you let me wait on her after I've done my pots an' kettles? I'd do 'em that quick-- if you'd let me wait on her now she's poor. Oh," breaking out afresh, "poor little Miss Sara, mum--that was called a princess."

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Just at that moment Ermengarde almost jumped off the bed, she was so startled by a sound she heard. It was like two distinct knocks on the wall.

The pupils bowed ceremoniously, and Sara made a little curtsy, and then they sat down and looked at each other again.

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"Lots of 'em, miss," Becky answered in quite a matter-of-fact manner. "There mostly is rats an' mice in attics. You gets used to the noise they makes scuttling about. I've got so I don't mind 'em s' long as they don't run over my piller."

"Yes," answered Sara, jumping to her feet. "Let us go and tell her. And then I will wash your face and brush your hair."

<"Dunno. Never got nothin' today--nowhere. I've axed an' axed.""I could 'ave e't two of 'em," they heard her cry into her pillow. "An' I never took a bite. 'Twas cook give it to her policeman."

Miss Minchin actually got up from her chair.

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<"Better keep her and make use of her," he added. "She's a clever child, I believe. You can get a good deal out of her as she grows older."It was very seldom that Miss Minchin mounted the last flight of stairs. Sara could only remember that she had done it once before. But now she was angry enough to be coming at least part of the way up, and it sounded as if she was driving Becky before her.

There was an affectionate, happy grin on her face, and she shuffled forward and stood nervously pulling at her fingers.

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nbaͶעӢ˼Ϸ ǰٱ Sara's cheeks felt warm. She went back to her seat and opened the book. She looked at the first page with a grave face. She knew it would be rude to smile, and she was very determined not to be rude. But it was very odd to find herself expected to study a page which told her that "le pere" meant "the father," and "la mere" meant "the mother." ϸ

Ǹڱ꣬˹´µǿ˿úܺã| ̵2018|Ԥԣ֧鷳ͻִ̡#ִ

nbaͶעΰİİδֱʲô She mounted her table and stood looking out. {I}t was a wonderful moment. There were floods of molten gold covering the west, as if a glorious tide was sweeping over the world. A deep, rich yellow light filled the air; the birds flying across the tops of the houses showed quite black against it. ϸ

nbaͶעͽƸĸͷȴͬСáʹġ| ̵2018|"÷"Ѱ:ϵ ½
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