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2020-08-12 11:38:56  Դձ
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ʹͶעַ:a g 9 559 v i p<'Sarah, come and sleep with me in the nursery; I daren't for mylife be alone with that poor child tonight: she might die; it's such astrange thing she should have that fit: I wonder if she sawanything. Missis was rather too hard.'Mrs. Reed was rather a stout woman; but, on hearing this strangeand audacious declaration, she ran nimbly up the stair, swept melike a whirlwind into the nursery, and crushing me down on the edge ofmy crib, dared me in an emphatic voice to rise from that place, orutter one syllable during the remainder of the day.

'On to the leads; will you come and see the view from thence?' Ifollowed still, up a very narrow staircase to the attics, and thenceby a ladder and through a trap-door to the roof of the hall. I was nowon a level with the crow colony, and could see into their nests.Leaning over the battlements and looking far down, I surveyed thegrounds laid out like a map: the bright and velvet lawn closelygirdling the grey base of the mansion; the field, wide as a park,dotted with its ancient timber; the wood, dun and sere, divided by apath visibly overgrown, greener with moss than the trees were withfoliage; the church at the gates, the road, the tranquil hills, allreposing in the autumn day's sun; the horizon bounded by apropitious sky, azure, marbled with pearly white. No feature in thescene was extraordinary, but all was pleasing. When I turned from itand repassed the trap-door, I could scarcely see my way down theladder; the attic seemed black as a vault compared with that arch ofblue air to which I had been looking up, and to that sunlit scene ofgrove, pasture, and green hill, of which the hall was the centre,and over which I had been gazing with delight.

ʹͶעɣ廭

She returned; with her own hands cleared her knitting apparatus anda book or two from the table, to make room for the tray which Leah nowbrought, and then herself handed me the refreshments. I felt ratherconfused at being the object of more attention than I had everbefore received, and, that too, shown by my employer and superior; butas she did not herself seem to consider she was doing anything outof her place, I thought it better to take her civilities quietly.

'Whose house is it?'

'Do you know Mr. Rochester?'

ʹͶעɣ ɻ

'Too much noise, Grace,' said Mrs. Fairfax. 'Rememberdirections!' Grace curtseyed silently and went in.<'I don't know: I asked Aunt Reed once, and she said possibly Imight have some poor, low relations called Eyre, but she knewnothing about them.'

I was stiff with long sitting, and bewildered with the noise andmotion of the coach: gathering my faculties, I looked about me.Rain, wind, and darkness filled the air; nevertheless, I dimlydiscerned a wall before me and a door open in it; through this doorI passed with my new guide: she shut and locked it behind her. Therewas now visible a house or houses- for the building spread far- withmany windows, and lights burning in some; we went up a broad pebblypath, splashing wet, and were admitted at a door; then the servant ledme through a passage into a room with a fire, where she left me alone.

ʹͶעɣйҶ ۻ

'Like heath that, in the wilderness,

'Did you say that tall lady was called Miss Temple?'

<'Place the child upon it.''Mind you don't,' said Bessie; and when she had ascertained thatI was really subsiding, she loosened her hold of me; then she and MissAbbot stood with folded arms, looking darkly and doubtfully on myface, as incredulous of my sanity.

'Take her away to the red-room, and lock her in there.' Fourhands were immediately laid upon me, and I was borne upstairs.

ʹͶעɣͻ

<'You have no business to take our books; you are a dependant,mama says; you have no money; your father left you none; you oughtto beg, and not to live here with gentlemen's children like us, andeat the same meals we do, and wear clothes at our mama's expense. Now,I'll teach you to rummage my bookshelves: for they are mine; all thehouse belongs to me, or will do in a few years. Go and stand by thedoor, out of the way of the mirror and the windows.''But it was always in her,' was the reply. 'I've told Missisoften my opinion about the child, and Missis agreed with me. She'san underhand little thing: I never saw a girl of her age with somuch cover.'

'Who talks of cadeaux?' said he gruffly. 'Did you expect a present,Miss Eyre? Are you fond of presents?' and he searched my face witheyes that I saw were dark, irate, and piercing.

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ʹͶעϰƽǰϦӲ쿴פϲ 'Monitors, fetch the supper-trays!' ϸ

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ʹͶעѲũҵũ岿:ǧټ,ϴڼ⹩Ӧ 'And so you're glad to leave me?' ϸ

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