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2020-08-12 23:20:06  Դձ
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My spirits reassume your former strength,

865ֻ棨廭

When she saw that this domesticke disquietnesse returned her nobenefit, but rather tended to her own consumption, then anyamendment in her miserable Husband, shee began thus to conferre withher private thoughts. This Husband of mine liveth with me, as if hewere no Husband, or I his Wife; the marriage bed, which should be acomfort to us both, seemeth hatefull to him, and as little pleasing tomee, because his minde is on his money, his head busied with worldlycogitations, and early and late in his counting-house, admitting nofamiliar conversation with me. Why should not I be as respectlesseof him, as he declares him selfe to be of me? I tooke him for anHusband, brought him a good and sufficient Dowry, thinking him to beman, and affected a woman as a man ought to doe, else he had neverbeene any Husband of mine. If he be a Woman hater, why did he makechoice of me to be his Wife? If I had not intended to be of the World,I could have coopt my selfe up in a Cloyster, and shorne my selfe aNunne, but that I was not born to such severity of life. My youthshall be blasted with age before I can truly understand what youth is,and I shall be branded with the disgraceful word barrennesse,knowing my selfe meete and able to be a Mother, were my Husband butwort the name of a Father, or expected issue and posterity, to leaveour memoriall to after times in our race, as all our predecessoursformerly have done, and for which mariage was chiefly instituted.Castles long besieged, doe yeeld at the last, and women wronged bytheir owne husbands, can hardly warrant their owne frailety,especially living among so many temptations, which flesh and bloud arenot alwaies able to resist. Well, I meane to be advised in thiscase, before I will hazard my honest reputation, either to suspitionor scandall, then which, no woman can have two heavier enemies, andvery few there are that can escape them.

THE SEVENTH DAY, THE SIXTH NOVELL

THE TENTH DAY, THE SECOND NOVELL

865ֻ棨 ɻ

It is now a long time since, that there lived Soldane in Babylon,named Beminidab, to whom (while he lived) many things happened,answerable to his owne desires. Among divers other Children bothmale and female, hee had a daughter called Alathiella, and shee(according to the common voyce of every one that saw her) was thefayrest Lady then living in all the world. And because the King ofCholcos had wonderfully assisted him, in a most valiant foughtenbattell against a mighty Armie of Arabians, who on a sodaine hadassailed him; he demanded his faire daughter in marriage, whichlikewise was kindly granted to him. Whereupon a goodly andwell-armed Ship was prepared for her, with full furnishment of allnecessary provision, and accompanied with an honourable traine both ofLords and Ladies, as also most costly and sumptuous accoustrements;commending her to the mercy of heaven, in this maner was she sentaway.

Moreover, at such times as Bruno had not supt with our Physitian, hewould bee sure to tell him on the morrow, that the night passed, hehad bin with the Company which he did wot of. And there (quoth he) theQueene of England having somewhat offended mee, I commanded, thatthe Gomedra, belonging to the Grand Cham of Tartaria, should bebrought me, and instantly shee was. What may be the meaning ofGomedrabe? said the Doctor, I understand not those difficult names.I beleeve you Sir, answered Bruno, nor do I need to marvallethereat: and yet I have heard Porcograsso speake, and also Vannacenna,and both unexperienced in our Language. You would say (replyed theDoctor) Hippocrates and Avicenna, who were two admirable Physitians.It may be so (said Bruno) and as hardly do I understand your names, asyou mine: but Gomedra, in the Grand Chams language, signifies Empressein ours. But had you once seene her Sir, she would make you forget allPhysicall observations, your arguments, receits, and medicines,onely to be in her heavenly presence, which words he used(perceiving his forward longing) to enflame him the more. Not longafter, as the doctor was holding the candle to Bruno, at theperfecting the bloody Battayle of the Cattes and Rattes, because hecould never bee wearied in his Companie, and therefore was the morewilling, to undergoe the office of the Candle-holder: he resolved toacquaint him with his minde, and being all alone by themselves, thushe began.

865ֻ棨йҶ ۻ

But she, finding that Rustico did not call on her to put the Devilin Hell, said one day: "Even though your Devil is punished and nolonger troubles you, my Hell gives me no peace. You will do acharity if with your Devil you will quiet the raging of my Hell, aswith my Hell I tamed the pride of your Devil To these demandsRustico on a diet of herbs and water could ill respond; and he toldher that to appease Hell would need too many devils, none the lesshe would do all that in him lay. At times he could satisfy her, but soseldom that it was like feeding an elephant with peas. Therefore thegirl thought she was not serving God as well as she would like, andshe grumbled most of the time.

Some perhaps will say, it was a small matter for a King, to giveaway two Damosels in marriage, and I confesse it: but I maintaine itto be great, and more then great, if we say, that a King, being soearnestly enamoured as this King was; should give her away to another,whom he so dearely affected himselfe, without receiving (in recompenceof his affection) so much as a leaffe, flowre, or the least fruit oflove. Yet such was the vertue of this magnificent King, expressed inso highly recompencing the noble Knights courtesie, honouring thetwo daughters so royally, and conquering his owne affections sovertuously.

When they were entred into Pagaminos house, and sat downe in theHall, he caused her to be called, and she (being readily preparedfor the purpose), came forth of her Chamber before them both, wherefriendly they sate conversing together; never uttering any word untoSignieur Ricciardo, or knowing him from any other stranger, thatPagamino might bring into the house with him. Which when my Lord theJudge beheld, (who expected to finde a farre more gracious welcome) hestoode as a man amazed, saying to himselfe. Perhaps theextraordinary greefe and melancholly suffered by me since the timeof her losse, hath so altred my wonted complexion, that shee is notable to take knowledge of me. Wherefore, going neerer to her, hesaide: Faire Love, deerely have I bought your going on fishing,because never man felt the like afflictions as I have done since theday when I lost you: but by this your uncivil silence, you seeme as ifyou did not know me. Why deerest love, seest thou not that I am thyhusband Ricciardo, who am come to pay what ransome this Gentlemanshall demaund, even in the house where now we are, so to convey theehome againe, upon his kind promise of thy deliverance, after thepayment of thy ransome?

865ֻ棨ͻ

So, stripping himselfe into his shirt lighting a Candle, andtaking tooles fit for the purpose; the Fat was whelmed over him, andhe being within it, wrought untill he sweated, with scraping andscrubbing. So that these poore Lovers, what they could notaccomplish as they wold, necessity enforced them to performe as theymight. And Peronella, looking in at the vent-hole, where the Liquorrunneth forth for the meshing; seemed to instruct her husband in thebusinesse, as espying those parts where the Fat was fowlest, saying:There, there Lazaro, tickle it there, the Gentleman payes well for it,and is worthy to have it: but see thou do thy selfe no harme goodHusband. I warrant thee Wife, answered Lazaro, hurt not your selfewith leaning your stomacke on the Fat, and leave the cleansing of itto me. To be breefe, the Brewing Fat was neatly cleansed, Peronellaand Striguario both well pleased, the money paide, and honestmeaning Lazaro not discontented.

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865ֻ۶ȫѧϰ When Melisso and Giosefo had passed over the Bridge, where theyintended to part each from other; a sudden motion happened into theminde of Melisso, which caused him to demaund of an aged man (who satecraving almes of Passengers at the Bridge foot) how the Bridge wascalled: Sir, answered the old man, this is called, The Goose Bridge.Which words when Giosefo heard, hee called to minde the saying of KingSalomon, and therefore immediately saide to Melisso. Worthy friend,and partner in my travell, I dare now assure sure that the counsellgiven me by King Salomon, may fall out most effectall and true: ForI plainely perceive, that I knew not how to handle my selfe-will'dwife, untill the Muletter did instruct me. So, requesting still toenjoy the others Company, they journeyed on, till at the length theycame to Laiazzo, where Giosefo retained Melisso still with him, forsome repose after so long a journey, and entertained him with veryhonourable respect and courtesie. ϸ

ձǿ6K Χ| ̵2018|˭Ϊ˽ļȨ˾һչĿꣿ

865ֻ˹ķ˹𿨴ɺʹӰ̫ޣɫĨ俪ȹ105 Jeronimo affecting a yong Maiden, named Silvestra, was constrained(by the earnest importunity of his Mother) to take a journey to Paris.At his return home from thence againe, he found his love Silvestramarried. By secret meanes, he got entrance into her house, and dyedupon the bed lying by her. Afterward, his body being carried toChurch, to receive buriall, she likewise died there instantly upon hiscoarse. ϸ

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