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类型【址:a g 9 559⒐ v i p】1:倪英达 大小:CT3I6Vwp48353KB 下载:wLq1vJ0095770次
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日期:2020-08-05 18:34:50
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1.【址:a g 9 559⒐ v i p】1  "My dear child," answered Eurynome, "all that you have said is true,go and tell your son about it, but first wash yourself and anoint yourface. Do not go about with your cheeks all covered with tears; it isnot right that you should grieve so incessantly; for Telemachus,whom you always prayed that you might live to see with a beard, isalready grown up."
2.  "Hear me, men of Ithaca, and I speak more particularly to thesuitors, for I see mischief brewing for them. Ulysses is not goingto be away much longer; indeed he is close at hand to deal out deathand destruction, not on them alone, but on many another of us who livein Ithaca. Let us then be wise in time, and put a stop to thiswickedness before he comes. Let the suitors do so of their own accord;it will be better for them, for I am not prophesying without dueknowledge; everything has happened to Ulysses as I foretold when theArgives set out for Troy, and he with them. I said that after goingthrough much hardship and losing all his men he should come home againin the twentieth year and that no one would know him; and now all thisis coming true."
3.  "Here I am, my dear sir," said he, "stay your hand therefore, andtell your father, or he will kill me in his rage against the suitorsfor having wasted his substance and been so foolishly disrespectful toyourself."
4.  Thus did the chiefs and rulers of the Phaecians to king Neptune,standing round his altar; and at the same time Ulysses woke up oncemore upon his own soil. He had been so long away that he did notknow it again; moreover, Jove's daughter Minerva had made it a foggyday, so that people might not know of his having come, and that shemight tell him everything without either his wife or his fellowcitizens and friends recognizing him until he had taken his revengeupon the wicked suitors. Everything, therefore, seemed quite differentto him- the long straight tracks, the harbours, the precipices, andthe goodly trees, appeared all changed as he started up and lookedupon his native land. So he smote his thighs with the flat of hishands and cried aloud despairingly.
5.  "When however, we had sacked the city of Priam, and were settingsail in our ships as heaven had dispersed us, then Jove saw fit to vexthe Argives on their homeward voyage; for they had Not all been eitherwise or understanding, and hence many came to a bad end through thedispleasure of Jove's daughter Minerva, who brought about a quarrelbetween the two sons of Atreus.
6.  Thus did he speak. Every one approved his saying, and agreed that heshould have his escort inasmuch as he had spoken reasonably. Then whenthey had made their drink-offerings, and had drunk each as much ashe was minded they went home to bed every man in his own abode,leaving Ulysses in the cloister with Arete and Alcinous while theservants were taking the things away after supper. Arete was the firstto speak, for she recognized the shirt, cloak, and good clothes thatUlysses was wearing, as the work of herself and of her maids; so shesaid, "Stranger, before we go any further, there is a question Ishould like to ask you. Who, and whence are you, and who gave youthose clothes? Did you not say you had come here from beyond the sea?"

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1.  And Menelaus answered, "Telemachus, if you insist on going I willnot detain you. not like to see a host either too fond of his guest ortoo rude to him. Moderation is best in all things, and not letting aman go when he wants to do so is as bad as telling him to go if hewould like to stay. One should treat a guest well as long as he isin the house and speed him when he wants to leave it. Wait, then, tillI can get your beautiful presents into your chariot, and till you haveyourself seen them. I will tell the women to prepare a sufficientdinner for you of what there may be in the house; it will be at oncemore proper and cheaper for you to get your dinner before settingout on such a long journey. If, moreover, you have a fancy formaking a tour in Hellas or in the Peloponnese, I will yoke myhorses, and will conduct you myself through all our principalcities. No one will send us away empty handed; every one will giveus something- a bronze tripod, a couple of mules, or a gold cup."
2.  "Thus spoke Eurylochus, and the men approved his words. Now thecattle, so fair and goodly, were feeding not far from the ship; themen, therefore drove in the best of them, and they all stood roundthem saying their prayers, and using young oak-shoots instead ofbarley-meal, for there was no barley left. When they had donepraying they killed the cows and dressed their carcasses; they cut outthe thigh bones, wrapped them round in two layers of fat, and set somepieces of raw meat on top of them. They had no wine with which to makedrink-offerings over the sacrifice while it was cooking, so theykept pouring on a little water from time to time while the inwardmeats were being grilled; then, when the thigh bones were burned andthey had tasted the inward meats, they cut the rest up small and putthe pieces upon the spits.
3.  Then Ulysses answered, "Madam, wife of Ulysses, do not disfigureyourself further by grieving thus bitterly for your loss, though I canhardly blame you for doing so. A woman who has loved her husband andborne him children, would naturally be grieved at losing him, eventhough he were a worse man than Ulysses, who they say was like agod. Still, cease your tears and listen to what I can tell I will hidenothing from you, and can say with perfect truth that I have latelyheard of Ulysses as being alive and on his way home; he is among theThesprotians, and is bringing back much valuable treasure that hehas begged from one and another of them; but his ship and all his crewwere lost as they were leaving the Thrinacian island, for Jove and thesun-god were angry with him because his men had slaughtered thesun-god's cattle, and they were all drowned to a man. But Ulyssesstuck to the keel of the ship and was drifted on to the land of thePhaecians, who are near of kin to the immortals, and who treated himas though he had been a god, giving him many presents, and wishingto escort him home safe and sound. In fact Ulysses would have beenhere long ago, had he not thought better to go from land to landgathering wealth; for there is no man living who is so wily as heis; there is no one can compare with him. Pheidon king of theThesprotians told me all this, and he swore to me- makingdrink-offerings in his house as he did so- that the ship was by thewater side and the crew found who would take Ulysses to his owncountry. He sent me off first, for there happened to be aThesprotian ship sailing for the wheat-growing island of Dulichium,but he showed me all treasure Ulysses had got together, and he hadenough lying in the house of king Pheidon to keep his family for tengenerations; but the king said Ulysses had gone to Dodona that hemight learn Jove's mind from the high oak tree, and know whether afterso long an absence he should return to Ithaca openly or in secret.So you may know he is safe and will be here shortly; he is close athand and cannot remain away from home much longer; nevertheless I willconfirm my words with an oath, and call Jove who is the first andmightiest of all gods to witness, as also that hearth of Ulysses towhich I have now come, that all I have spoken shall surely come topass. Ulysses will return in this self same year; with the end of thismoon and the beginning of the next he will be here."
4.  The others applauded what Antinous had said, and each one sent hisservant to bring his present. Antinous's man returned with a large andlovely dress most exquisitely embroidered. It had twelve beautifullymade brooch pins of pure gold with which to fasten it. Eurymachusimmediately brought her a magnificent chain of gold and amber beadsthat gleamed like sunlight. Eurydamas's two men returned with someearrings fashioned into three brilliant pendants which glistenedmost beautifully; while king Pisander son of Polyctor gave her anecklace of the rarest workmanship, and every one else brought her abeautiful present of some kind.
5.  "I am by birth a Cretan; my father was a well-to-do man, who hadmany sons born in marriage, whereas I was the son of a slave whom hehad purchased for a concubine; nevertheless, my father Castor son ofHylax (whose lineage I claim, and who was held in the highest honouramong the Cretans for his wealth, prosperity, and the valour of hissons) put me on the same level with my brothers who had been born inwedlock. When, however, death took him to the house of Hades, his sonsdivided his estate and cast lots for their shares, but to me they gavea holding and little else; nevertheless, my valour enabled me to marryinto a rich family, for I was not given to bragging, or shirking onthe field of battle. It is all over now; still, if you look at thestraw you can see what the ear was, for I have had trouble enoughand to spare. Mars and Minerva made me doughty in war; when I hadpicked my men to surprise the enemy with an ambuscade I never gavedeath so much as a thought, but was the first to leap forward andspear all whom I could overtake. Such was I in battle, but I did notcare about farm work, nor the frugal home life of those who wouldbring up children. My delight was in ships, fighting, javelins, andarrows- things that most men shudder to think of; but one man likesone thing and another another, and this was what I was mostnaturally inclined to. Before the Achaeans went to Troy, nine timeswas I in command of men and ships on foreign service, and I amassedmuch wealth. I had my pick of the spoil in the first instance, andmuch more was allotted to me later on.
6.  As she spoke the goddess dispersed the mist and the land appeared.Then Ulysses rejoiced at finding himself again in his own land, andkissed the bounteous soil; he lifted up his hands and prayed to thenymphs, saying, "Naiad nymphs, daughters of Jove, I made sure that Iwas never again to see you, now therefore I greet you with allloving salutations, and I will bring you offerings as in the old days,if Jove's redoubtable daughter will grant me life, and bring my son tomanhood."

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1.  "Neptune, however, lay with his daughter, and she had a son byhim, the great Nausithous, who reigned over the Phaecians.Nausithous had two sons Rhexenor and Alcinous; Apollo killed the firstof them while he was still a bridegroom and without male issue; but heleft a daughter Arete, whom Alcinous married, and honours as noother woman is honoured of all those that keep house along withtheir husbands.
2.  "And I answered, 'Circe, how can you expect me to be friendly withyou when you have just been turning all my men into pigs? And now thatyou have got me here myself, you mean me mischief when you ask me togo to bed with you, and will unman me and make me fit for nothing. Ishall certainly not consent to go to bed with you unless you willfirst take your solemn oath to plot no further harm against me.'
3.  Euryclea did as she was told and closed the doors of the women'sapartments.
4.  Then Minerva said to Jove, "Father, son of Saturn, king of kings,answer me this question- What do you propose to do? Will you setthem fighting still further, or will you make peace between them?"
5.   "Ulysses, noble son of Laertes, so you would start home to yourown land at once? Good luck go with you, but if you could only knowhow much suffering is in store for you before you get back to your owncountry, you would stay where you are, keep house along with me, andlet me make you immortal, no matter how anxious you may be to see thiswife of yours, of whom you are thinking all the time day after day;yet I flatter myself that at am no whit less tall or well-looking thanshe is, for it is not to be expected that a mortal woman shouldcompare in beauty with an immortal."
6.  "O queen," he said, "I implore your aid- but tell me, are you agoddess or are you a mortal woman? If you are a goddess and dwell inheaven, I can only conjecture that you are Jove's daughter Diana,for your face and figure resemble none but hers; if on the otherhand you are a mortal and live on earth, thrice happy are yourfather and mother- thrice happy, too, are your brothers and sisters;how proud and delighted they must feel when they see so fair a scionas yourself going out to a dance; most happy, however, of all willhe be whose wedding gifts have been the richest, and who takes youto his own home. I never yet saw any one so beautiful, neither man norwoman, and am lost in admiration as I behold you. I can only compareyou to a young palm tree which I saw when I was at Delos growingnear the altar of Apollo- for I was there, too, with much people afterme, when I was on that journey which has been the source of all mytroubles. Never yet did such a young plant shoot out of the groundas that was, and I admired and wondered at it exactly as I nowadmire and wonder at yourself. I dare not clasp your knees, but I amin great distress; yesterday made the twentieth day that I had beentossing about upon the sea. The winds and waves have taken me allthe way from the Ogygian island, and now fate has flung me upon thiscoast that I may endure still further suffering; for I do not thinkthat I have yet come to the end of it, but rather that heaven hasstill much evil in store for me.

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1.  "Trust me for that," said she, "I will not lose sight of you whenonce we set about it, and I would imagine that some of those who aredevouring your substance will then bespatter the pavement with theirblood and brains. I will begin by disguising you so that no humanbeing shall know you; I will cover your body with wrinkles; youshall lose all your yellow hair; I will clothe you in a garment thatshall fill all who see it with loathing; I will blear your fine eyesfor you, and make you an unseemly object in the sight of thesuitors, of your wife, and of the son whom you left behind you. Thengo at once to the swineherd who is in charge of your pigs; he has beenalways well affected towards you, and is devoted to Penelope andyour son; you will find him feeding his pigs near the rock that iscalled Raven by the fountain Arethusa, where they are fattening onbeechmast and spring water after their manner. Stay with him andfind out how things are going, while I proceed to Sparta and seeyour son, who is with Menelaus at Lacedaemon, where he has gone to tryand find out whether you are still alive."
2.  "Run and fetch them," answered Ulysses, "while my arrows hold out,or when I am alone they may get me away from the door."
3.  As he spoke he threw his shabby old tattered wallet over hisshoulders, by the cord from which it hung, and Eumaeus gave him astick to his liking. The two then started, leaving the station incharge of the dogs and herdsmen who remained behind; the swineherd ledthe way and his master followed after, looking like some broken-downold tramp as he leaned upon his staff, and his clothes were all inrags. When they had got over the rough steep ground and were nearingthe city, they reached the fountain from which the citizens drew theirwater. This had been made by Ithacus, Neritus, and Polyctor. There wasa grove of water-loving poplars planted in a circle all round it,and the clear cold water came down to it from a rock high up, whileabove the fountain there was an altar to the nymphs, at which allwayfarers used to sacrifice. Here Melanthius son of Dolius overtookthem as he was driving down some goats, the best in his flock, for thesuitors' dinner, and there were two shepherds with him. When he sawEumaeus and Ulysses he reviled them with outrageous and unseemlylanguage, which made Ulysses very angry.
4、  Laertes was delighted when he heard this. "Good heavens, heexclaimed, "what a day I am enjoying: I do indeed rejoice at it. Myson and grandson are vying with one another in the matter of valour."
5、  "Thus, then, did we sit and hold sad talk with one another, I on theone side of the trench with my sword held over the blood, and theghost of my comrade saying all this to me from the other side. Thencame the ghost of my dead mother Anticlea, daughter to Autolycus. Ihad left her alive when I set out for Troy and was moved to tears whenI saw her, but even so, for all my sorrow I would not let her comenear the blood till I had asked my questions of Teiresias.

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  • 包清工 08-04

      Meanwhile lovely Polycaste, Nestor's youngest daughter, washedTelemachus. When she had washed him and anointed him with oil, shebrought him a fair mantle and shirt, and he looked like a god as hecame from the bath and took his seat by the side of Nestor. When theouter meats were done they drew them off the spits and sat down todinner where they were waited upon by some worthy henchmen, who keptpouring them out their wine in cups of gold. As soon as they had hadhad enough to eat and drink Nestor said, "Sons, put Telemachus'shorses to the chariot that he may start at once."

  • 包姓 08-04

      "This may not be, Agelaus," answered Melanthius, "the mouth of thenarrow passage is dangerously near the entrance to the outer court.One brave man could prevent any number from getting in. But I knowwhat I will do, I will bring you arms from the store room, for I amsure it is there that Ulysses and his son have put them."

  • 蒋文红 08-04

       "Meanwhile her four servants, who are her housemaids, set abouttheir work. They are the children of the groves and fountains, andof the holy waters that run down into the sea. One of them spread afair purple cloth over a seat, and laid a carpet underneath it.Another brought tables of silver up to the seats, and set them withbaskets of gold. A third mixed some sweet wine with water in asilver bowl and put golden cups upon the tables, while the fourthshe brought in water and set it to boil in a large cauldron over agood fire which she had lighted. When the water in the cauldron wasboiling, she poured cold into it till it was just as I liked it, andthen she set me in a bath and began washing me from the cauldron aboutthe head and shoulders, to take the tire and stiffness out of mylimbs. As soon as she had done washing me and anointing me with oil,she arrayed me in a good cloak and shirt and led me to a richlydecorated seat inlaid with silver; there was a footstool also under myfeet. A maid servant then brought me water in a beautiful goldenewer and poured it into a silver basin for me to wash my hands, andshe drew a clean table beside me; an upper servant brought me breadand offered me many things of what there was in the house, and thenCirce bade me eat, but I would not, and sat without heeding what wasbefore me, still moody and suspicious.

  • 许小玲 08-04

      Then was Ulysses glad and prayed aloud saying, "Father Jove, grantthat Alcinous may do all as he has said, for so he will win animperishable name among mankind, and at the same time I shall returnto my country."

  • 夏中华 08-03

    {  Ulysses answered, "May King Jove grant all happiness toTelemachus, and fulfil the desire of his heart."

  • 周殿生 08-02

      "Ulysses," replied Alcinous, "not one of us who sees you has anyidea that you are a charlatan or a swindler. I know there are manypeople going about who tell such plausible stories that it is veryhard to see through them, but there is a style about your languagewhich assures me of your good disposition. Moreover you have toldthe story of your own misfortunes, and those of the Argives, as thoughyou were a practised bard; but tell me, and tell me true, whetheryou saw any of the mighty heroes who went to Troy at the same timewith yourself, and perished there. The evenings are still at theirlongest, and it is not yet bed time- go on, therefore, with yourdivine story, for I could stay here listening till to-morrowmorning, so long as you will continue to tell us of your adventures."}

  • 汉诺 08-02

      "Telemachus," said she, "the men are on board and at their oars,waiting for you to give your orders, so make haste and let us be off."

  • 达瓦孜 08-02

      On this Ulysses began to move off, and said, "Your looks, my finesir, are better than your breeding; if you were in your own houseyou would not spare a poor man so much as a pinch of salt, forthough you are in another man's, and surrounded with abundance, youcannot find it in you to give him even a piece of bread."

  • 王睿 08-01

       As he spoke he girded on his armour. Then he roused Telemachus,Philoetius, and Eumaeus, and told them all to put on their armouralso. This they did, and armed themselves. When they had done so, theyopened the gates and sallied forth, Ulysses leading the way. It wasnow daylight, but Minerva nevertheless concealed them in darknessand led them quickly out of the town.

  • 刘丹丹 07-30

    {  "I will tell you all about them," replied Eumaeus, "Laertes is stillliving and prays heaven to let him depart peacefully his own house,for he is terribly distressed about the absence of his son, and alsoabout the death of his wife, which grieved him greatly and aged himmore than anything else did. She came to an unhappy end through sorrowfor her son: may no friend or neighbour who has dealt kindly by mecome to such an end as she did. As long as she was still living,though she was always grieving, I used to like seeing her and askingher how she did, for she brought me up along with her daughterCtimene, the youngest of her children; we were boy and girltogether, and she made little difference between us. When, however, weboth grew up, they sent Ctimene to Same and received a splendiddowry for her. As for me, my mistress gave me a good shirt and cloakwith a pair of sandals for my feet, and sent me off into thecountry, but she was just as fond of me as ever. This is all over now.Still it has pleased heaven to prosper my work in the situationwhich I now hold. I have enough to eat and drink, and can findsomething for any respectable stranger who comes here; but there is nogetting a kind word or deed out of my mistress, for the house hasfallen into the hands of wicked people. Servants want sometimes to seetheir mistress and have a talk with her; they like to have somethingto eat and drink at the house, and something too to take back withthem into the country. This is what will keep servants in a goodhumour."

  • 德佩思特 07-30

      "Then came also the ghost of Theban Teiresias, with his goldensceptre in his hand. He knew me and said, 'Ulysses, noble son ofLaertes, why, poor man, have you left the light of day and come downto visit the dead in this sad place? Stand back from the trench andwithdraw your sword that I may drink of the blood and answer yourquestions truly.'

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