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类型【址:a g 9 559⒐ v i p】1:苏文欢 大小:ttxw485A29900KB 下载:Mpl6l98b13699次
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日期:2020-08-10 02:28:29
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1.【址:a g 9 559⒐ v i p】1  They swore as he told them, and when they had completed their oathTelemachus put in a word and said, "Stranger, if you have a mind tosettle with this fellow, you need not be afraid of any one here.Whoever strikes you will have to fight more than one. I am host, andthe other chiefs, Antinous and Eurymachus, both of them men ofunderstanding, are of the same mind as I am."
2.  "The men when they got on shore followed a level road by which thepeople draw their firewood from the mountains into the town, tillpresently they met a young woman who had come outside to fetchwater, and who was daughter to a Laestrygonian named Antiphates. Shewas going to the fountain Artacia from which the people bring in theirwater, and when my men had come close up to her, they asked her whothe king of that country might be, and over what kind of people heruled; so she directed them to her father's house, but when they gotthere they found his wife to be a giantess as huge as a mountain,and they were horrified at the sight of her.
3.  As she spoke she touched him with her golden wand. First she threw afair clean shirt and cloak about his shoulders; then she made himyounger and of more imposing presence; she gave him back his colour,filled out his cheeks, and let his beard become dark again. Then shewent away and Ulysses came back inside the hut. His son wasastounded when he saw him, and turned his eyes away for fear hemight be looking upon a god.
4.  And Ulysses answered, "In good truth, goddess, it seems I shouldhave come to much the same bad end in my own house as Agamemnon did,if you had not given me such timely information. Advise me how I shallbest avenge myself. Stand by my side and put your courage into myheart as on the day when we loosed Troy's fair diadem from her brow.Help me now as you did then, and I will fight three hundred men, ifyou, goddess, will be with me."
5.  Telemachus was the first to speak. "So you have got back,Eumaeus," said he. "What is the news of the town? Have the suitorsreturned, or are they still waiting over yonder, to take me on myway home?"
6.  Ulysses was glad at finding himself, as Minerva told him, in his owncountry, and he began to answer, but he did not speak the truth, andmade up a lying story in the instinctive wiliness of his heart.

计划指导

1.  "Good heavens," said he, "see how the gods have saved this manfrom destruction. We kept a succession of scouts upon the headlandsall day long, and when the sun was down we never went on shore tosleep, but waited in the ship all night till morning in the hope ofcapturing and killing him; but some god has conveyed him home in spiteof us. Let us consider how we can make an end of him. He must notescape us; our affair is never likely to come off while is alive,for he is very shrewd, and public feeling is by no means all on ourside. We must make haste before he can call the Achaeans inassembly; he will lose no time in doing so, for he will be furiouswith us, and will tell all the world how we plotted to kill him, butfailed to take him. The people will not like this when they come toknow of it; we must see that they do us no hurt, nor drive us from ourown country into exile. Let us try and lay hold of him either on hisfarm away from the town, or on the road hither. Then we can divideup his property amongst us, and let his mother and the man who marriesher have the house. If this does not please you, and you wishTelemachus to live on and hold his father's property, then we must notgather here and eat up his goods in this way, but must make our offersto Penelope each from his own house, and she can marry the man whowill give the most for her, and whose lot it is to win her."
2.  The minstrel Phemius son of Terpes- he who had been forced by thesuitors to sing to them- now tried to save his life. He was standingnear towards the trap door, and held his lyre in his hand. He didnot know whether to fly out of the cloister and sit down by thealtar of Jove that was in the outer court, and on which both Laertesand Ulysses had offered up the thigh bones of many an ox, or whetherto go straight up to Ulysses and embrace his knees, but in the endhe deemed it best to embrace Ulysses' knees. So he laid his lyre onthe ground the ground between the mixing-bowl and the silver-studdedseat; then going up to Ulysses he caught hold of his knees and said,"Ulysses, I beseech you have mercy on me and spare me. You will besorry for it afterwards if you kill a bard who can sing both forgods and men as I can. I make all my lays myself, and heaven visits mewith every kind of inspiration. I would sing to you as though you werea god, do not therefore be in such a hurry to cut my head off. Yourown son Telemachus will tell you that I did not want to frequentyour house and sing to the suitors after their meals, but they weretoo many and too strong for me, so they made me."
3.  "'We went,' said he, as you told us, through the forest, and inthe middle of it there was a fine house built with cut stones in aplace that could be seen from far. There we found a woman, or else shewas a goddess, working at her loom and singing sweetly; so the menshouted to her and called her, whereon she at once came down, openedthe door, and invited us in. The others did not suspect any mischiefso they followed her into the house, but I stayed where I was, for Ithought there might be some treachery. From that moment I saw themno more, for not one of them ever came out, though I sat a long timewatching for them.'
4.  BOOK XIII.
5.  "My dear," answered Penelope, "I have no wish to set myself up,nor to depreciate you; but I am not struck by your appearance, for Ivery well remember what kind of a man you were when you set sailfrom Ithaca. Nevertheless, Euryclea, take his bed outside the bedchamber that he himself built. Bring the bed outside this room, andput bedding upon it with fleeces, good coverlets, and blankets."
6.  "My dear child," answered Euryclea, "I am not mocking you. It isquite true as I tell you that Ulysses is come home again. He was thestranger whom they all kept on treating so badly in the cloister.Telemachus knew all the time that he was come back, but kept hisfather's secret that he might have his revenge on all these wickedpeople.

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1.  So saying she gave the robe over to him and he received it gladly.Then Pisistratus put the presents into the chariot, and admired themall as he did so. Presently Menelaus took Telemachus and Pisistratusinto the house, and they both of them sat down to table. A maidservant brought them water in a beautiful golden ewer, and poured itinto a silver basin for them to wash their hands, and she drew a cleantable beside them; an upper servant brought them bread and offeredthem many good things of what there was in the house. Eteoneuscarved the meat and gave them each their portions, while Megapenthespoured out the wine. Then they laid their hands upon the good thingsthat were before them, but as soon as they had had had enough to eatand drink Telemachus and Pisistratus yoked the horses, and tooktheir places in the chariot. They drove out through the innergateway and under the echoing gatehouse of the outer court, andMenelaus came after them with a golden goblet of wine in his righthand that they might make a drink-offering before they set out. Hestood in front of the horses and pledged them, saying, "Farewell toboth of you; see that you tell Nestor how I have treated you, for hewas as kind to me as any father could be while we Achaeans werefighting before Troy."
2.  When the child of morning, rosy-fingered Dawn, appeared, the sons ofAutolycus went out with their hounds hunting, and Ulysses went too.They climbed the wooded slopes of Parnassus and soon reached itsbreezy upland valleys; but as the sun was beginning to beat upon thefields, fresh-risen from the slow still currents of Oceanus, they cameto a mountain dell. The dogs were in front searching for the tracks ofthe beast they were chasing, and after them came the sons ofAutolycus, among whom was Ulysses, close behind the dogs, and he had along spear in his hand. Here was the lair of a huge boar among somethick brushwood, so dense that the wind and rain could not get throughit, nor could the sun's rays pierce it, and the ground underneathlay thick with fallen leaves. The boar heard the noise of the men'sfeet, and the hounds baying on every side as the huntsmen came up tohim, so rushed from his lair, raised the bristles on his neck, andstood at bay with fire flashing from his eyes. Ulysses was the firstto raise his spear and try to drive it into the brute, but the boarwas too quick for him, and charged him sideways, ripping him above theknee with a gash that tore deep though it did not reach the bone. Asfor the boar, Ulysses hit him on the right shoulder, and the pointof the spear went right through him, so that he fell groaning in thedust until the life went out of him. The sons of Autolycus busiedthemselves with the carcass of the boar, and bound Ulysses' wound;then, after saying a spell to stop the bleeding, they went home asfast as they could. But when Autolycus and his sons had thoroughlyhealed Ulysses, they made him some splendid presents, and sent himback to Ithaca with much mutual good will. When he got back, hisfather and mother were rejoiced to see him, and asked him all aboutit, and how he had hurt himself to get the scar; so he told them howthe boar had ripped him when he was out hunting with Autolycus and hissons on Mount Parnassus.
3.  But Ulysses, when he had taken it up and examined it all over,strung it as easily as a skilled bard strings a new peg of his lyreand makes the twisted gut fast at both ends. Then he took it in hisright hand to prove the string, and it sang sweetly under his touchlike the twittering of a swallow. The suitors were dismayed, andturned colour as they heard it; at that moment, moreover, Jovethundered loudly as a sign, and the heart of Ulysses rejoiced as heheard the omen that the son of scheming Saturn had sent him.
4.  "The ghosts of other dead men stood near me and told me each his ownmelancholy tale; but that of Ajax son of Telamon alone held aloof-still angry with me for having won the cause in our dispute aboutthe armour of Achilles. Thetis had offered it as a prize, but theTrojan prisoners and Minerva were the judges. Would that I had nevergained the day in such a contest, for it cost the life of Ajax, whowas foremost of all the Danaans after the son of Peleus, alike instature and prowess.
5.   As spoke he took Telemachus' spear, whereon he crossed the stonethreshold and came inside. Ulysses rose from his seat to give himplace as he entered, but Telemachus checked him; "Sit down, stranger."said he, "I can easily find another seat, and there is one here whowill lay it for me."
6.  "My dear nurse," said Penelope, "however wise you may be you canhardly fathom the counsels of the gods. Nevertheless, we will go insearch of my son, that I may see the corpses of the suitors, and theman who has killed them."

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1.  They all held their peace except King Alcinous, who began, "Sir,we have had much pleasure in hearing all that you have told us, fromwhich I understand that you are willing to show your prowess, ashaving been displeased with some insolent remarks that have beenmade to you by one of our athletes, and which could never have beenuttered by any one who knows how to talk with propriety. I hope youwill apprehend my meaning, and will explain to any be one of yourchief men who may be dining with yourself and your family when you gethome, that we have an hereditary aptitude for accomplishments of allkinds. We are not particularly remarkable for our boxing, nor yet aswrestlers, but we are singularly fleet of foot and are excellentsailors. We are extremely fond of good dinners, music, and dancing; wealso like frequent changes of linen, warm baths, and good beds, sonow, please, some of you who are the best dancers set about dancing,that our guest on his return home may be able to tell his friendshow much we surpass all other nations as sailors, runners, dancers,minstrels. Demodocus has left his lyre at my house, so run some one orother of you and fetch it for him."
2.  "When we reached the harbour we found it land-locked under steepcliffs, with a narrow entrance between two headlands. My captains tookall their ships inside, and made them fast close to one another, forthere was never so much as a breath of wind inside, but it wasalways dead calm. I kept my own ship outside, and moored it to arock at the very end of the point; then I climbed a high rock toreconnoitre, but could see no sign neither of man nor cattle, onlysome smoke rising from the ground. So I sent two of my company with anattendant to find out what sort of people the inhabitants were.
3.  "But the men disobeyed my orders, took to their own devices, andravaged the land of the Egyptians, killing the men, and taking theirwives and children captives. The alarm was soon carried to the city,and when they heard the war-cry, the people came out at daybreaktill the plain was filled with soldiers horse and foot, and with thegleam of armour. Then Jove spread panic among my men, and they wouldno longer face the enemy, for they found themselves surrounded. TheEgyptians killed many of us, and took the rest alive to do forcedlabour for them; as for myself, they gave me to a friend who met them,to take to Cyprus, Dmetor by name, son of Iasus, who was a great manin Cyprus. Thence I am come hither in a state of great misery."
4、  Telemachus and the son of Nestor stayed their horses at the gate,whereon Eteoneus servant to Menelaus came out, and as soon as he sawthem ran hurrying back into the house to tell his Master. He wentclose up to him and said, "Menelaus, there are some strangers comehere, two men, who look like sons of Jove. What are we to do? Shall wetake their horses out, or tell them to find friends elsewhere asthey best can?"
5、  "'Let me tell you,' said I, 'whichever of the goddesses you mayhappen to be, that I am not staying here of my own accord, but musthave offended the gods that live in heaven. Tell me, therefore, forthe gods know everything. which of the immortals it is that ishindering me in this way, and tell me also how I may sail the sea soas to reach my home.'

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  • 唐由之 08-09

      And Minerva said, "Father, son of Saturn, King of kings, if, then,the gods now mean that Ulysses should get home, we should first sendMercury to the Ogygian island to tell Calypso that we have made up ourminds and that he is to return. In the meantime I will go to Ithaca,to put heart into Ulysses' son Telemachus; I will embolden him to callthe Achaeans in assembly, and speak out to the suitors of his motherPenelope, who persist in eating up any number of his sheep and oxen; Iwill also conduct him to Sparta and to Pylos, to see if he can hearanything about the return of his dear father- for this will makepeople speak well of him."

  • 庞家钰 08-09

      "When I saw him I tried to pacify him and said, 'Ajax, will younot forget and forgive even in death, but must the judgement aboutthat hateful armour still rankle with you? It cost us Argives dearenough to lose such a tower of strength as you were to us. Wemourned you as much as we mourned Achilles son of Peleus himself,nor can the blame be laid on anything but on the spite which Jove boreagainst the Danaans, for it was this that made him counsel yourdestruction- come hither, therefore, bring your proud spirit intosubjection, and hear what I can tell you.'

  • 毛选民 08-09

       Many a plausible tale did Ulysses further tell her, and Penelopewept as she listened, for her heart was melted. As the snow wastesupon the mountain tops when the winds from South East and West havebreathed upon it and thawed it till the rivers run bank full withwater, even so did her cheeks overflow with tears for the husbandwho was all the time sitting by her side. Ulysses felt for her and wasfor her, but he kept his eyes as hard as or iron without lettingthem so much as quiver, so cunningly did he restrain his tears.Then, when she had relieved herself by weeping, she turned to himagain and said: "Now, stranger, I shall put you to the test and seewhether or no you really did entertain my husband and his men, asyou say you did. Tell me, then, how he was dressed, what kind of a manhe was to look at, and so also with his companions."

  • 伊拉克拉 08-09

      When Menelaus heard this he immediately told his wife and servantsto prepare a sufficient dinner from what there might be in thehouse. At this moment Eteoneus joined him, for he lived close by andhad just got up; so Menelaus told him to light the fire and cooksome meat, which he at once did. Then Menelaus went down into hisfragrant store room, not alone, but Helen went too, withMegapenthes. When he reached the place where the treasures of hishouse were kept, he selected a double cup, and told his sonMegapenthes to bring also a silver mixing-bowl. Meanwhile Helen wentto the chest where she kept the lovely dresses which she had made withher own hands, and took out one that was largest and mostbeautifully enriched with embroidery; it glittered like a star, andlay at the very bottom of the chest. Then they all came back throughthe house again till they got to Telemachus, and Menelaus said,"Telemachus, may Jove, the mighty husband of Juno, bring you safelyhome according to your desire. I will now present you with thefinest and most precious piece of plate in all my house. It is amixing-bowl of pure silver, except the rim, which is inlaid with gold,and it is the work of Vulcan. Phaedimus king of the Sidonians mademe a present of it in the course of a visit that I paid him while Iwas on my return home. I should like to give it to you."

  • 苏诣伦 08-08

    {  "More's the pity," answered Telemachus, "I am sorry for him, butwe must leave him to himself just now. If people could have everythingtheir own way, the first thing I should choose would be the returnof my father; but go, and give your message; then make haste backagain, and do not turn out of your way to tell Laertes. Tell my motherto send one of her women secretly with the news at once, and let himhear it from her."

  • 阚青鹤 08-07

      But Minerva would not let the suitors for one moment drop theirinsolence, for she wanted Ulysses to become still more bitteragainst them. Now there happened to be among them a ribald fellow,whose name was Ctesippus, and who came from Same. This man,confident in his great wealth, was paying court to the wife ofUlysses, and said to the suitors, "Hear what I have to say. Thestranger has already had as large a portion as any one else; this iswell, for it is not right nor reasonable to ill-treat any guest ofTelemachus who comes here. I will, however, make him a present on myown account, that he may have something to give to the bath-woman,or to some other of Ulysses' servants."}

  • 何流 08-07

      He then chose twenty men, and they went down to their. ship and tothe sea side; they drew the vessel into the water and got her mast andsails inside her; they bound the oars to the thole-pins with twistedthongs of leather, all in due course, and spread the white sailsaloft, while their fine servants brought them their armour. Thenthey made the ship fast a little way out, came on shore again, gottheir suppers, and waited till night should fall.

  • 徐家昨 08-07

      But Neptune did not forget the threats with which he had alreadythreatened Ulysses, so he took counsel with Jove. "Father Jove,"said he, "I shall no longer be held in any sort of respect among yougods, if mortals like the Phaeacians, who are my own flesh andblood, show such small regard for me. I said I would Ulysses gethome when he had suffered sufficiently. I did not say that he shouldnever get home at all, for I knew you had already nodded your headabout it, and promised that he should do so; but now they have broughthim in a ship fast asleep and have landed him in Ithaca afterloading him with more magnificent presents of bronze, gold, andraiment than he would ever have brought back from Troy, if he hadhad his share of the spoil and got home without misadventure."

  • 廖父 08-06

       BUT Minerva went to the fair city of Lacedaemon to tell Ulysses' sonthat he was to return at once. She found him and Pisistratussleeping in the forecourt of Menelaus's house; Pisistratus was fastasleep, but Telemachus could get no rest all night for thinking of hisunhappy father, so Minerva went close up to him and said:

  • 巴旦木 08-04

    {  "Fountain nymphs," he cried, "children of Jove, if ever Ulyssesburned you thigh bones covered with fat whether of lambs or kids,grant my prayer that heaven may send him home. He would soon put anend to the swaggering threats with which such men as you go aboutinsulting people-gadding all over the town while your flocks are goingto ruin through bad shepherding."

  • 谢开红 08-04

      "If you are Ulysses," said he, "then what you have said is just.We have done much wrong on your lands and in your house. ButAntinous who was the head and front of the offending lies low already.It was all his doing. It was not that he wanted to marry Penelope;he did not so much care about that; what he wanted was something quitedifferent, and Jove has not vouchsafed it to him; he wanted to killyour son and to be chief man in Ithaca. Now, therefore, that he hasmet the death which was his due, spare the lives of your people. Wewill make everything good among ourselves, and pay you in full for allthat we have eaten and drunk. Each one of us shall pay you a fineworth twenty oxen, and we will keep on giving you gold and bronze tillyour heart is softened. Until we have done this no one can complain ofyour being enraged against us."

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