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类型【址:a g 9 559⒐ v i p】1:珍妮弗·洛特兹 大小:XaDjHiCE43770KB 下载:Bfo0J2Wb15437次
版本:v57705 系统:Android3.8.x以上 好评:ayvFOKIG90317条
日期:2020-08-10 04:20:58
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1.【址:a g 9 559⒐ v i p】1  Now, notwithstanding the actions of Calandrino have beeneindifferently canvazed among us; yet, remembring what Philostratus notlong since saide, That they intended to nothing more then matter ofmirth: I presume the boldlier, to report another Novell of him, besidethem already past. And, were I willing to conceale the truth, andcloath it in more circumstantiall maner: I could make use ofcontrary names, and paint it in a poeticall fiction, perhaps moreprobable, though not so pleasing. But because wandring from thetruth of things, doth much diminish (in relatic the delight of thehearers: I will build boldly on my fore-alledged reason, and tel youtruly how it hapned.
2.  OCCASIONED BY LOVE; WITH SOME PARTICULAR DESCRIPTION,
3.  Now I am further that after we have tasted a Cup of precious Wine,fed on a few delicate Comfits, and danced a dance or two to the rareMusicke: every one taketh a Lady by the hand, of whom he pleaseth tomake his election, and she conducteth him to her Chamber, in verygrave and gracious manner. Concerning the Chambers there, each of themresembleth a Paradise to looke on, they are so faire and goodly; andno lesse odorifferous in smell, then the sweetest perfumes in yourApothecaries shoppes, or the rare compounds of Spices, when they arebeaten in an open Morter. And as for the Beds, they are infinitelyricher, then the verie costliest belonging to the Duke of Venice:yet (in such) each man is appointed to take his rest, the Musicke ofrare Cymbals lasting all night long, much better to be by youconsidered, then in my rude eloquence expressed.
4.  At the appointed time, when the woman came to confession to theAbbot, and was on her knees before him, to his no small contentment,before she would say any thing else, thus she began: Sacred Father, ifGod had not given me such an husband as I have, or else had bestowedon me none at all; I might have beene so happy, by the meanes ofyour holy doctrine, very easily to have entred into the way, whereofyou spake the other day, which leadeth to eternall life. But when Iconsider with my selfe, what manner of man Ferando is, and thinke uponhis folly withall; I may well terme my selfe to be a widow, although Iam a maried wife, because while he liveth, I cannot have any otherhusband. And yet (as sottish as you see him) he is (without anyoccasion given him) so extreamely jealous of me; as I am not able tolive with him, but only in continuall tribulation and hearts griefe.In which respect, before I enter into confession, I most humblybeseech you, that you would vouchsafe (in this distresse) to assist mewith your fatherly advice and counsell, because, if thereby I cannotattaine to a more pleasing kinde of happinesse; neither confessior, orany thing else, is able to doe me any good at all.
5.  By this unexpected pennance imposed on Madame Helena, she utterlyforgot her amorous friend; and (from thence forward) carefully kepther selfe from fond loves allurements, and such scornfull behaviour,wherein she was most disorderly faulty. And Reniero the Scholler,understanding that Ancilla had broken her leg, r , which he reputed asa punishment sufficient for her, held himselfe satisfyed, becauseneither the Mistresse nor her Maide, could now make any great boast,of his nights hard entertainment, and so concealed all matters else.
6.  Unto the place which made me first to mourne.

计划指导

1.  At such time as Octavius Caesar (not as yet named Augustus, but onlyin the office called Triumveri) governed the Romane Empire, theredwelt in Rome a Gentleman, named Publius Quintus Fulvius, a man ofsingular understanding, who having one son, called Titus QuintusFulvius, of towardly yeares and apprehension, sent him to Athens tolearne Philosophy, but with letters of familiar commendations, to aNoble Athenian Gentleman, named Chremes, being his ancient friend, oflong acquaintance. This Gentleman lodged Titus in his owne house, ascompanion to his son, named Gisippus, both of them studyingtogether, under the tutoring of a Philosopher, called Aristippus.These two yong Gentlemen living thus in one Citty, House, and Schoole,it bred betweene them such a brother-hoode and amity, as they couldnot be severed from one another, but only by the accident of death;nor could either of them enjoy any content, but when they were bothtogether in company.
2.  Then calling for the glasse of water, which she had readily preparedthe day before, and powring it upon the heart lying in the Cup,couragiously advancing it to her mouth, she dranke it up every drop;which being done, she lay downe upon her bed, holding her Lovers heartfast in her hand, and laying it so neere to her owne as she could. Nowalthough her women knew not what water it was, yet when they had seeneher to quaffe it off in that manner, they sent word to the King, whomuch suspecting what had happened, went in all haste to hisDaughters Chamber, entring at the very instant, when she was laideupon her bed; beholding her in such passionate pangs, with tearesstreaming downe his reverend beard, he used many kinde words tocomfort her: when boldly thus she spake unto him. Father (quoth she)well may you spare these teares, because they are unfitting for you,and not any way desired by me; who but your selfe, hath seene anyman to mourne for his owne wilfull offence. Neverthelesse, if butthe least jot of that love do yet abide in you, whereof you havemade such liberall profession to me; let me obtaine this my verylast request, to wit, that seeing I might not privately enjoy thebenefit of Guiscardoes love, and while he lived, let yet (in death)one publike grave containe both our bodies, that death may affoord us,what you so cruelly in life denied us.
3.  Well may you conceive, that nothing more hammerd in the Doctorshead, then this rare voyage to Corsica, and Bruno was his dailyguest at dinner and supper, with such extraordinary apparances ofkindnesse and courtesie, as if the Physitian could not live, except hehad the company of Bruno. Who seeing himselfe to bee so lovinglyrespected, and hating ingratitude, for favours so abundantly heaped onhim: hee painted the whole story of Lent about his Hall, and anAgnus Dei fairely gilt, on the portall of his Chamber, as also agoodly Urinall on his street doore, to the end, that such as had needeof his counsell, might know where so judicious a Doctour dwelt. In aGallery likewise by his Garden, he painted the furious Battailebetweene the Rats and Cats, which did (not a little) delight MasterDoctor.
4.  Guidotto of Cremona, out of this mortall life, left a Daughter ofhis, with Jacomino of Pavia. Giovanni di Severino, and Menghino daMinghole, fell both in love with the young Maiden, and fought for her;who being afterward knowne to be the Sister to Giovanni, she was givenin mariage to Menghino.
5.  Philostratus, gladly I do accept your gift; and to the end that yemay the better remember your selfe, concerning what you have donehitherto: I will and command, that generall preparation be madeagainst to morrow, for faire and happy fortunes hapning to Lovers,after former cruell and unkinde accidents. Which proposition wasvery pleasing to them all.
6.  They being provided, some with Prongges, Pitchforkes and Spades, andothers with the like weapons fit for Husbandry, stept into the waybefore Aniolliero: and beleeving undoubtedly, that he had robde theman which pursued him in his shirt, stayed and apprehended him.Whatsoever Aniolliero could doe or say, prevailed not any thing withthe unmannerly Clownes, but when Fortarigo was arrived among them,he braved Aniolliero most impudently, saying.

推荐功能

1.  Then every one could presently say, that Signior Guido had spokennothing but the truth, and were much ashamed of their owne folly,and shallow estimation which they had made of Guido, desiring nevermore after to meddle with him so grossely, and thanking Signior Betto,for so well reforming their ignorance, by his much betterapprehension.
2.  But thought me happie, being in Love.
3.  THE FIFT DAY, THE FOURTH NOVELL
4.  The President being desirous to make the boy his, the Count (whosedayly prayers were to the same purpose) frankly gave his Son to theNobleman: albeit naturall and fatherly affection, urged someunwillingnesse to part so with him; yet necessity and discretion,found it best for the benefit of them both. Being thus eased of carefor his Son and Daughter, and they (though in different places) yetunder good and worthy government; the Count would continue no longerin England: but, as best hee could procure the meanes, passed overinto Ireland, and being arrived at a place called Stanford, becameservant to an Earle of that Country, a Gentleman professing Armes,on whom he attended as a serving man, and lived a long while in thatestate very painfully.
5.   Can I never finde
6.  But thought me happie, being in Love.

应用

1.  Before many dales were past, it was his fortune to meete withBlondello, who having told this jest to divers of his friends, andmuch good merriment made thereat: he saluted Guiotto in ceremoniousmanner, saying. How didst thou like the fat Lampreyes and Sturgeon,which thou fedst on at the house of Messer Corso Donati? Wel Sir(answered Guiotto) perhaps before eight dayes passe over my head, thoushalt meet with as pleasing a dinner as I did. So, parting away fromBlondello, he met with a Porter or burthen-bearer, such as are usuallysent on errands; and hyring him to deliver a message for him, gave hima glasse bottle, and bringing him neere to the Hal-house ofCavicciuli, shewed him there a knight, called Signior PhillipoArgenti, a man of huge stature, stout, strong, vain-glorious, fierceand sooner mooved to anger then any other man. To him (quothGuiotto) thou must go with this bottle in thy hand, and say thus tohim. Sir, Blondello sent me to you, and courteously entreateth you,that you would enrubinate this glasse bottle with your best ClaretWine; because he would make merry with a few friends of his. Butbeware he lay no hand on thee, because he may bee easi induced tomisuse thee, and so my businesse be disappointed. Well Sir replied thePorter, shal I say any thing else unto him? No (quoth Guiotto) only goand deliver this message, and when thou art returned, Ile pay thee forthy paines.
2.  Making a martyrdome of my poore hart.
3.  WHEREBY WEE MAY LEARNE, THAT SUCH THINGS AS SOMETIME SEEME
4、  DISCOVERING THE SIMPLICITY OF SOME SILLY WITTED MEN, AND HOW
5、  MORE AT LARGE APPROVED

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网友评论(bARD4i8h26248))

  • 蒋瑜香 08-09

      Surely Sir, said Calandrino, it is further hence, then to Abruzzi?Yes questionlesse, replyed Maso; but, to a willing minde, no travellseemeth tedious.

  • 戚戚 08-09

      His Subjects beleeving, that he had caused the children to beeslaine, blamed him greatly, thought him to be a most cruell man, anddid highly compassionate the Ladies case: who when shee came incompany of other Gentlewomen, which mourned for their deceassedchildren, would answere nothing else: but that they could not bemore pleasing to her, then they were to the father that begot them.

  • 汪长福 08-09

       Other in their desire, feele blessednesse,

  • 王锋 08-09

      It came to passe within a short while after, that this Gentlemanof Cathalogna sayled (with some charge of his) into Alexandria,carrying thither certaine Faulcons, which he presented to theSoldan, who oftentimes welcommed this Gentleman to his table, where heobserved the behaviour of Sicurano, attending on his MaistersTrencher, and therewith was so highly pleased; that hee requested tohave him from the Gentleman, who (for his more advancement)willingly parted with his so lately entertained servant. Sicuranowas so ready and discreet in his daily services, that he grew in asgreat grace with the Soldan, as before hee had done with Enchararcho.

  • 金大地 08-08

    {  By this time Madam Philomena, at command of the King, (MadamPampinea ceasing) prepared to follow next in order, whereupon thus shebegan. What is it (Gracious Ladies) that Kings cannot do (if theylist) in matters of greatest importance, and especially unto such asmost they should declare their magnificence? He then that performethwhat he ought to do, when it is within his owne power, doth well.But it is not so much to bee admired, neither deserveth halfe thecommendations, as when one man doth good to another, when least itis expected, as being out of his power, and yet performed. In whichrespect, because you have so extolled king Piero, as appearing notmeanly meritorious in your judgements; I make no doubt but you will bemuch more pleased, when the actions of our equals are duly considered,and shal paralell any of the greatest Kings. Wherefore I purpose totell you a Novel, concerning an honorable curtesie of two worthyfriends.

  • 郭穰 08-07

      Peradventure you thinke, it will be a sufficient excuse for you,to say: I did it, in regard hee was a Ghibelline. Can you imagine thisto be justice in a King, that such as get into their possession inthis manner (whatsoever it be) ought to use it in this sort? Let metell you Sir, it was a most worthy victory for you, to conquer KingManfred: but it is farre more famous victory, for a man to conquerhimselfe. You therfore, who are ordained to correct vices in othermen, learne first to subdue them in your selfe, and (by brideling thisinordinate appetite) set not a foule blemish on so faire a fame, aswill be honour to you to preserve spotlesse.}

  • 柳松华 08-07

      Magdalena, having acquainted her Husband with her vertuousintention, for preserving her Sisters life, and disappointing the Dukein his wicked desire; was as contrary to her true meaning in thiscase, as Ninetta had formerly beene adverse to Restagnone, onely beingover-ruled likewise by jealousie, and perswaded in his rash opinion,that the Duke had already dishonoured Magdalena, otherwise, he wouldnot have delivered Ninetta out of prison. Mad fury gave further fireto this unmanly perswasion, and nothing will now quench this but thelife of poore Magdalena, suddenly sacrificed in the rescue of herSister, such a divell is anger, when the understandings bright eyeis thereby abused. No credit might bee given to her womanlyprotestations, or any thing seeme to alter his bloody purpose; but,having slaine Magdalena with his Poniard (notwithstanding her tearesand humble entreaties) he ranne in haste to Ninettaes Chamber, she notdreaming on any such desperate accident, and to her he used thesedissembling speeches.

  • 吉米·尹 08-07

      That other Women are as wise as

  • 钟燕婷 08-06

       Guillaume Boursier, with a few quaint and familiar words, checkt themiserable covetousnesse of Signior Herminio de Grimaldi.

  • 黄淑珍 08-04

    {  THE FIRST DAY, THE SIXT NOVELL

  • 布加迪 08-04

      The disconsolate Lady perceiving, that the Schollers wordes savouredof no mercy, but rather as coveting her desperate ending; with theteares streaming downe her cheekes, thus she replied. Wel Sir,seeing there is no matter of worth in me, whereby to derive anycompassion from you: yet for that Ladies sake, whom you have electedworthy to enjoy your love, and so farre excelleth mee in Wisedome;vouchsafe to pardon mee, and suffer my garments to be brought me,wherewith to cover my nakednesse, and so to descend downe from thisTower, if it may stand with your gentle Nature to admit it.

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